Skip to main content

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in an armchair discussion with founder and CEO of BroadbandTV Corp, Shahrfad Rafaiti, at the Collision tech conference in Toronto on May 20, 2019.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told hundreds of attendees at a conference in Toronto on Monday that Canada’s thriving technology sector is a result of the country’s openness to immigrants and he hopes Canadians will continue to view immigration positively.

Trudeau was the first keynote speaker at the four-day conference, called Collision, which is being held in Canada for the first time.

Organizers are calling the event North America’s fastest growing technology conference, and this is the first time it is being held outside the United States.

Story continues below advertisement

While being interviewed by Shahrzad Rafati, founder and CEO of Canadian entertainment company BroadbandTV Corporation, Trudeau stressed that Canada has become a major source of talent for tech all over the world and that it is attracting entrepreneurs to the country.

He also cited the federal government’s investments in education and research as reasons for success in Canadian companies and startups.

“Access to talent obviously comes from immigration and it comes from training young and educating Canadians right,” said Trudeau.

He said while many countries including the U.S. “are closing themselves off more to immigration,” Canada is staying open.

“As we see anxieties and worries around the world, Canadians know that we get more resilient communities, we get better solutions, we get better innovations, when we bring in people from all around the world,” Trudeau said.

“That’s why we are doing well even at a time of anxiety – we have seen the Canadian economy flourish over the past few years.”

Rafati also asked the prime minister about his recent announcement regarding the creation of a digital charter that would combat hate speech, misinformation and election interference.

Story continues below advertisement

Last week at the VivaTech conference in Paris, Trudeau said he’s confident the framework his government will propose will restore the faith of citizens while holding online platforms accountable.

Rafati asked the prime minister to go into further detail about the proposal, but Trudeau only said it would focus on the government working collaboratively with tech companies to ensure citizen’s personal information is safe and that solutions are made in regards to online harassment.

Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains is expected to provide more details at a summit on digital governance in Ottawa in late May.

“What you wouldn’t allow in a personal space – in a real space – shouldn’t be happening where people spend so much more time – in a virtual space,” Trudeau said.

The Collision conference runs from Monday to Thursday at the Enercare Centre.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter