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Maya Farrell is consoled by Vicki Keith as they arrived in Collins Bay Harbour in Kingston,. Ont., on July 8, 2018. Farrell had to abandon her across lake Ontario swim.Lars Hagberg

After 20 hours and 35 kilometres of swimming, an Ottawa teenager was forced Sunday to abandon a second attempt to swim across Lake Ontario.

Maya Farrell, 16, set out Saturday morning with the goal of becoming the first person to swim the 88-km stretch of the lake between Rochester, N.Y., and Brighton, Ont.

But on Sunday morning, her dad posted an update to social media with bad news. Around 3:20 a.m. on Sunday, he wrote, after struggling with muscle pain in her shoulder for four hours, Ms. Farrell had to be pulled out of the water.

Brighton

ONTARIO

Toronto

Lake Ontario

Rochester

FINISH

Brighton, Ont.

401

Cobourg

Lake Ontario

July 8, 3:43 a.m.

Maya’s last recorded position before being pulled out of the water

0

15

KM

START

July 7, 2018, 7:41 a.m.

Rochester, NY

NEW

YORK

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN;

OSM CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; GARMIN

Brighton

ONTARIO

Toronto

Lake Ontario

Rochester

FINISH

Brighton, Ont.

401

Cobourg

Lake Ontario

July 8, 3:43 a.m.

Maya’s last recorded position before being pulled out of the water

0

15

KM

START

July 7, 2018, 7:41 a.m.

Rochester, NY

NEW

YORK

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN;

OSM CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; GARMIN

Brighton

ONTARIO

Toronto

Lake Ontario

Rochester

FINISH

Brighton, Ont.

401

Cobourg

Lake Ontario

July 8, 3:43 a.m.

Maya’s last recorded position before being pulled out of the water

0

15

KM

START

July 7, 2018, 7:41 a.m.

Rochester, NY

NEW

YORK

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: TILEZEN; OSM CONTRIBUTORS; HIU; GARMIN

With 53 km to go, it was a devastating end for the teen – who trained for two years, raised close to $9,000 for charity and gave a presentation at her high school in June about her ambition. A documentary crew was chronicling her attempt.

But the most frustrating part for her was that this was the second time Lake Ontario had “won.”

Open this photo in gallery:

Maya Farrell being consoled by Vicki Keith as they arrived in Collins Bay Harbour in Kingston,. Ont., on July 8, 2018.Lars Hagberg

Back in 2016, Ms. Farrell made her first attempt to cross the lake. But after 24 hours of swimming, with just 300 metres to go from the shore, she was forced out of the water by lightning.

The defeat was “heartbreaking,” she said. She was so close. So a few days later, at the beach in Toronto with her mom, she vowed to try again – and to challenge herself even further.

She trained with Vicki Keith, a record-holding swimmer who was the first person to swim across all five Great Lakes, and the only person to have completed the 104-kilometre double crossing of Lake Ontario.

The 88-kilometre swim Ms. Farrell had planned spans the widest stretch of the lake, and would break the record for the longest single crossing of the lake. “It was something a lot of people had considered impossible,” Ms. Keith said.

This February, Ms. Farrell’s mom passed away. Her grandfather’s death followed in April. For a few weeks, the teen thought about abandoning her plan.

But it had been her grandfather who had inspired her with stories about his own cycling journey across the country as a young man. And her mother had encouraged her every step of the way. She decided to persevere through her grief and continue her training.

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Maya Farrell and her coach Vicki Keith joke before getting into the water.John Schlia Photography

As she set out early Saturday morning in Rochester, the sun was out and the water was warm. Her biggest challenge, she knew, would be physical pain.

“After 10 hours even, every muscle hurts,” she said Thursday evening, before the swim. “After about 30 km, it gets pretty painful. After that point pretty much it’s all mental. You just have to decide whether you want to keep going or not – and I know I’m never going to give up.”

But in the end, after she tried for hours to find a way to continue on despite her muscle pain, which Ms. Keith said was likely caused by a change in stroke technique, her father and coach decided she had to end it.

“We made the decision for her, because Vicki and I knew she would not voluntarily get out of the water,” her dad, Matt Scoppa, wrote in an Instagram post.

She wouldn’t have, she insists. From the boat Sunday, as she and her crew headed to shore, Ms. Farrell said she was disappointed. And while she was focused on rest and recovery, it’s clear she’s already itching to get back in the water.

“I’m not done, for sure,” she said.

“Maya is not a quitter,” Ms. Keith said. “She made that so clear during her swim. There’s no way she can leave this undone. I know we’ll be seeing something from her [...] in the future.”

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Maya Farrell is seen here swimming across Lake Ontario (Rochester, N.Y. to Brighton, Ont.) on July 7, 2018.Vicki Keith

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