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Jessie Simpson, who suffered a catastrophic brain injury in a 2016 attack, now lives in a long-term care home where he can only feed himself if his food is cut into small pieces. He also requires a wheelchair, cannot control his bowel or bladder and requires two people to help him get out of bed.Handout

Jessie Simpson’s mother is still trying to raise money for his care despite him winning a $6.9-million settlement for the injuries he sustained in a baseball bat beating that a Mountie said were the worst he had ever seen.

A law professor at the University of British Columbia says the situation is consistent with other civil suit victories in which the victim’s money may not come easily despite a ruling of the court. “The saying that you can’t bleed blood from a stone truly applies in some civil cases,” Marc Kazimirski, also a veteran personal injuries lawyer, said in an interview.

Mr. Simpson has costly long-term care needs after the attack nearly five years ago.

One morning in June, 2016, Kristopher Teichrieb saw Mr. Simpson, then 18, in his yard in Kamloops, B.C., and went out with the baseball bat. According to the B.C. Supreme Court ruling, Mr. Teichrieb, who outweighed Mr. Simpson by 85 pounds, punched, kicked and dragged Mr. Simpson in addition to using the bat. A Mountie said the resulting injuries were worse than those he had seen on victims beaten to death.

Mr. Simpson, who suffered a catastrophic brain injury, now lives in a long-term care home where he can only feed himself if his food is cut into small pieces. He also requires a wheelchair, cannot control his bowel or bladder and requires two people to help him get out of bed.

“Jessie does have some understanding that he is disabled,” Justice Sukhdev Dley of B.C. Supreme Court wrote in ruling this month on the civil suit launched against Mr. Teichrieb.

Photo of Jessie Simpson.Handout

In a separate proceeding, Justice Dley sentenced Mr. Teichrieb to seven years in prison after he pleaded guilty to aggravated assault.

As a result of a civil suit launched by Mr. Simpson’s mother, Susanna, Justice Dley awarded Mr. Simpson $6.9-million in damages, including $1.3-million for future losses, and $3-million for the cost of future care. The judge calculated that Mr. Simpson, based on his interests, would have gone on to be a roofer and earn $1.5-million during his career.

According to Justice Bley’s ruling, Mr. Teichrieb did not appear in court for the civil suit. No lawyer is listed as representing him.

Ms. Simpson said in a phone interview and e-mail that she cannot discuss aspects of securing the damages. She said she has had a GoFundMe account and is planning an online auction at the end of May as she tries to bring him home in July. She said they could really use a new wheelchair van with a lift, and that she could “definitely use a few things.”

Ms. Simpson formerly worked as an elders’ co-ordinator for the Skeetchestn Indian Band near Kamloops, earning $30,000 to $40,000 annually, but was fired, according to the civil ruling, when she took a leave and could not commit to a return date. She now cleans houses.

The Simpson family’s lawyer said there is nothing she can say about some case details. “Unfortunately, in the interests of our clients, we are not able to comment on the collections aspect of the judgment at this time,” Kelsey O’Bray-Lazar said in an e-mail.

As a result of a civil suit launched by Mr. Simpson’s mother, Susanna, Justice Sukhdev Dley awarded Mr. Simpson $6.9-million in damages, including $1.3-million for future losses, and $3-million for the cost of future care.Handout

Prof. Kazimirski, the veteran lawyer, said substantial damages do not necessarily make the recipients wealthy. “Often people see a big number and say the person is going to be rich. What they don’t understand is that this is the court’s determination of what replaces the things that have been taken away from the injured person,” he said in the interview.

But sometimes there is simply no prospect of being paid. ”[This] comes up in many contexts, not just an assault case like this,” he said.

The shortfalls, he said, can also occur in motor vehicle cases where an injured person suffers devastating injuries and the person at fault doesn’t have enough insurance.

There is some good news, though, Prof. Kazimirski said. “We are fortunate to live in a country where there are social support for people who need them, but it certainly doesn’t make [Mr. Simpson] whole or replace what has been lost,” he said.

Mr. Simpson has received about $430,000 from the provincial Crime Victim Assistance Program to help with income support, rehabilitation and some costs associated with the long-term care home where he lives. But the judge pointed out in his ruling that there is no assurance the payments will continue.

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