Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Support quality journalism
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
The Globe and Mail
Support quality journalism
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Globe and Mail website displayed on various devices
Just$1.99
per week
for the first 24 weeks

var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){console.log("scroll");var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1);

Couple Chynna Deese and Lucas Fowler.

Handout

Mounties are set to release their investigative findings into the killings of three people in northern British Columbia that triggered a weeks-long national manhunt.

On Friday, B.C. RCMP will take the unusual step of holding a technical briefing with media – a process usually reserved to explain more complicated or detailed matters – followed by a regular news conference and the public release of a report into the homicides of Chynna Deese, Lucas Fowler and Leonard Dyck.

Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, were charged with second-degree murder in Mr. Dyck’s death, and named suspects in those of Ms. Deese and Mr. Fowler.

Story continues below advertisement

Police would not say Thursday whether they will release videos that the suspects had filmed of themselves while on the run. But Peter German, a former deputy commissioner with the RCMP, said that would be unlikely.

“Police will want to avoid sensationalizing what happened and in any way be seen as giving these individuals a platform in death,” he said.

The Globe and Mail previously reported that the suspects had filmed several videos of themselves, including a last will and testament, while making their way across the country. Their family members have been shown a short clip.

Mr. German said it is good that police will hold Friday’s briefing, as the file “captured the imaginations of Canadians” who are now seeking closure.

“The public wants to know why this happened in the first place, and so anything that the RCMP can do to shed light on motive I believe would be very helpful to the public,” he said.

The bodies of Ms. Deese, a 24-year-old American, and Mr. Fowler, her 23-year-old Australian boyfriend, were found near Liard Hot Springs on July 15. Four days later, the body of Mr. Dyck, a 64-year-old lecturer in the University of British Columbia’s botany department, was found about 470-kilometres away.

Leonard Dyck.

HO/The Canadian Press

Mr. McLeod and Mr. Schmegelsky were named suspects the following week.

Story continues below advertisement

A highly publicized manhunt spanning five provinces ensued, involving police dogs, drones and the Canadian Armed Forces scouring the dense brush of the Canadian wilderness. Communities were put on lock down and police received more than 1,000 tips from across the country.

The search ended on Aug. 7 in northern Manitoba, when items found on a shoreline gave investigators an area of focus, leading them to the discovery of the suspects’ bodies. Police said that the pair had died of suicide by gunfire, and that two firearms were located with their bodies.

Sarah Leamon, a lawyer representing Bryer’s father, Al Schmegelsky, said Thursday that her client is eagerly awaiting answers that the RCMP news conference will provide, but is not certain how he should feel.

“He says it’s not an easy thing to deal with,” Ms. Leamon said in an interview.

She added that he extends his sympathies to anyone affected by the tragedy.

The RCMP had not, as of mid-Thursday, made any arrangements for the elder Mr. Schmegelsky to be briefed, Ms. Leamon said.

Story continues below advertisement

“I first learned about the [RCMP news conference] from the media,” she said. “But for the media, we might have been caught off guard.”

We have a weekly Western Canada newsletter written by our B.C. and Alberta bureau chiefs, providing a comprehensive package of the news you need to know about the region and its place in the issues facing Canada. Sign up today.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies