Skip to main content

Foresters and ranchers in British Columbia’s Kootenay Boundary region will have to follow a new set of rules to ensure birds’ nests, animal dens, mineral licks, bat nurseries and other wildlife habitat isn’t disturbed.

The provincial government says it is issuing the order to help wildlife survive and thrive.

Environment Minister George Heyman says they know many of the species at risk in the area will have a much better chance for survival if their habitat is protected.

Story continues below advertisement

The new protection order is the first of its kind in B.C. and will take effect on July 1 in the Kootenay Boundary region, although the government says the intent is to eventually have similar orders provincewide.

The protections cover the nests for bald eagles, osprey, and great blue herons, the burrows for American badgers, the dens of the grizzly bears, bat hibernation sites and several other wildlife features.

Forest Minister Doug Donaldson says wildlife are dependant on undisturbed nests, burrows and other features for shelter, breeding and to raise their young and these extra measures will keep them safe.

Forestry operators and range tenure holders will be offered training to help them identify and take the steps needed to protect the habitats.

The government says consultation was carried out with those directly affected and with local Indigenous communities.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter