Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Flooding is seen in Grand Forks, B.C. in this undated handout photo.

HO/The Canadian Press

The Fraser Valley is under threat of flooding, B.C. officials say, as a surge in water levels in the province’s Interior has forced the evacuation of thousands of residents.

Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth announced the opening of a regional emergency centre in Surrey, empowered to co-ordinate planning for the valley east of Vancouver as the waters of the Fraser River rose ahead of where they should be at this time of year.

“People need to be aware that it is not just the Interior of British Columbia that is at risk of floods, but also the Lower Mainland and the Fraser,” Mr. Farnworth said in an interview. Emergency Info BC this week said flooding in the province had led to evacuation orders or alerts in seven regional districts and seven First Nations.

Story continues below advertisement

Premier John Horgan, citing the evacuation of more than 4,000 individuals across the province due to flooding, said on Friday that the government is responding to the situation with measures that include disaster financial assistance to affected people in the Cariboo and Thompson Nicola regions. In addition, millions of sandbags have been distributed where needed to help hold back floodwaters.

“The flood season has only just begun. We are working closely with local governments to protect communities, and we will continue to assist in any way we can,” Mr. Horgan said in a statement.

David Campbell, head of the British Columbia River Forecast Centre, told a media briefing that water from melted snowpacks and rain is leading to “fairly rapid” rises in the Fraser River system as part of a trend that observers expect will continue into next week.

Kelowna

Alta.

B.C.

Okanagan Lake

Detail

B.C.

Vancouver

U.S.

Beaverdell

Okanagan Falls

Kettle River

West Kettle River

Keremeos

Granby River

Okanagan River

Similkameen

River

Grand Forks

Osoyoos

Midway

0

10

U.S.

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE:

TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU

Alta.

Kelowna

B.C.

Okanagan Lake

Detail

B.C.

Vancouver

U.S.

Beaverdell

Okanagan Falls

Kettle River

West Kettle River

Keremeos

Granby River

Okanagan River

Similkameen

River

Grand Forks

Midway

Osoyoos

0

10

U.S.

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU

Alta.

Kelowna

B.C.

Detail

Okanagan Lake

Vancouver

U.S.

B.C.

Beaverdell

Okanagan Falls

Kettle River

West Kettle River

Keremeos

Granby River

Okanagan River

Similkameen

River

Osoyoos

Grand Forks

Midway

0

10

U.S.

KM

MURAT YÜKSELIR / THE GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: TILEZEN; OPENSTREETMAP CONTRIBUTORS; HIU

“As water is rising throughout the region, we are seeing that this is making its way down into the Fraser River system. We have had rises for the Fraser system from the headwaters down to the Lower Mainland. We are expecting that trend to continue,” Mr. Campbell said.

Meanwhile, he said there is a kind of ongoing “holding pattern” as heavy rain and water from warmed snow packs works its way through the province’s river systems.

As of Friday, there were 31 evacuation orders in B.C affecting 1,993 homes, and 23 states of local emergency, according to Chris Duffy, executive director of programs with Emergency Management BC.

He told the media briefing that there are 36 evacuation alerts affecting 930 homes in the province and that 19 local emergency operations centres have been activated.

Story continues below advertisement

Grand Forks, a community of about 4,000 people in the West Kootenay region about 500 kilometres east of Vancouver, has been hit hard by flooding.

City resident Steve Horkoff said the water seemed, on Friday, to be receding a bit, but that the future is uncertain given melting snow in area mountains and the warmth of the day. “I don’t know what the hell to call this,” he said in an interview, adding that his home had been spared from flooding, but the rising waters have affected various properties in town.

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for

Okanagan Lake at Kelowna, B.C.

Primary water level (provisional–subject to

change, in metres, data recorded every 5 minutes

190

180

170

160

150

140

130

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for

Granby River at Grand Forks, B.C.

Data recorded every 5 minutes

Primary water level (provisional),

in metres, left scale

600

5.0

Discharge (provisional),

in cubic metres per second,

right scale

4.5

500

4.0

400

3.5

300

3.0

200

2.5

100

2.0

0

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

1

0

11

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: EXTRACTED FROM THE

ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE CANADA REAL-TIME

HYDROMETRIC DATA WEB SITE.

*REAL-TIME UNIT VALUE DATA TO THE PUBLIC WITHIN

6 HOURS OF RECORDING IN THE FIELD

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for

Okanagan Lake at Kelowna, B.C.

Primary water level (provisional–subject to

change, in metres, data recorded every 5 minutes

190

180

170

160

150

140

130

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for Granby River

at Grand Forks, B.C.

Data recorded every 5 minutes

Primary water level (provisional),

in metres, left scale

600

5.0

4.5

500

Discharge (provisional),

in cubic metres per second,

right scale

4.0

400

3.5

300

3.0

200

2.5

100

2.0

0

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

1

0

11

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: EXTRACTED FROM THE ENVIRONMENT

AND CLIMATE CHANGE CANADA REAL-TIME HYDROMETRIC DATA WEB

SITE. *REAL-TIME UNIT VALUE DATA TO THE PUBLIC WITHIN 6 HOURS

OF RECORDING IN THE FIELD

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for Okanagan Lake at Kelowna, B.C.

Primary water level (provisional–subject to change, in metres,

data recorded every 5 minutes

190

180

170

160

150

140

130

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

Real-time* hydrometric data graph for Granby River

at Grand Forks, B.C.

Data recorded every 5 minutes

600

5.0

Primary water level (provisional), in metres, left scale

Discharge (provisional), in cubic metres per second,

right scale

4.5

500

4.0

400

3.5

300

3.0

200

2.5

100

2.0

0

May 4

2018

5

6

7

8

9

1

0

11

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: EXTRACTED FROM THE ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE

CHANGE CANADA REAL-TIME HYDROMETRIC DATA WEBSITE. *REAL-TIME UNIT VALUE

DATA TO THE PUBLIC WITHIN 6 HOURS OF RECORDING IN THE FIELD

Frank Konrad, the mayor of Grand Forks, said things were going “relatively well,” but that he was leaving management of the situation to the emergency operations centre.

He said in an interview that he had not been downtown to check the situation. “There’s already so many lookie loos driving around; curiosity, obviously, is getting the better of most people and it’s causing so many traffic jams and problems,” he said,

Asked about damage to local businesses, he said the credit union has water in its basement, but City Hall has not been touched. He said he has not otherwise been briefed on the situation.

He said there was flooding last year, but it was not as bad as this year.

Story continues below advertisement

Mr. Campbell, during his media conference, said he expects continued pressure in the Boundary region of the province, particularly in Grand Forks.

Mr. Konrad said the situation appears to be a mix of good and bad news. “We have crested apparently this morning. The outlook is that it won’t subside anytime soon, but, hopefully, no further higher levels,” he said,

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies