Skip to main content
Don’t miss our
best deal ever
offer ends july 23
save over $160
Sale ends in
$6
for
6 months
Don’t miss our
best deal ever
$6
for 6 months
save over $160
// //

A man who spent Christmas in jail after police say he hosted parties in violation of public-health orders is now bound by bail conditions that require him to answer the door at his home in Vancouver if officers knock.

Sergeant Steve Addison said police tried unsuccessfully to explain the risk of large gatherings to the man before issuing multiple warnings and fining him twice.

“People have called us complaining about large social gatherings and noise complaints and ample warning was given to this individual,” Sgt. Addison told a news conference on Wednesday.

Story continues below advertisement

“Unfortunately, he’s made it clear that he has no intention to stop and our officers were able to obtain an arrest warrant.”

The man was taken into custody on Christmas Day and spent the night in jail, police say.

Officers encountered large groups of people at the man’s home when they responded to complaints, Sgt. Addison said.

The man’s bail conditions require him to comply with public-health orders that allows those living alone to host a limit of two people they see regularly, police said.

The Vancouver Police Department has received 12 complaints about noise and parties at the man’s home since September, Sgt. Addison said.

Officers issued two tickets for $2,300 earlier this month and obtained an arrest warrant after a neighbour complained about another loud party on Dec. 18.

“This should serve as a reminder to anyone who thinks it’s still OK to ignore the public-health order and put other people at risk,” Sgt. Addison said.

Story continues below advertisement

“I understand that people are longing for social contact and want things to be back to the way they were. Unfortunately, we’re not there yet. We’re asking people to abide by the public-health order. We’re asking people to stay home or stay close to home.”

Police have issued 21 tickets related to social gatherings prohibited by public-health measures that are in place until Jan. 8, Sgt. Addison said.

Extra officers will be enforcing public-health orders on New Year’s Eve, primarily in the downtown area.

Bars and restaurants will be open until 10 p.m., but police do not want people spilling onto the streets at that time and gathering in groups, as happened on Halloween, Sgt. Addison said.

Sign up for the Coronavirus Update newsletter to read the day’s essential coronavirus news, features and explainers written by Globe reporters and editors.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies