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Canada In photos: Colourized images offer new perspectives on last days of the First World War

As part of a current exhibit, the Canadian War Museum has released several newly colourized images from the Canadian Corps’ role in the last hundred days of the First World War. Based on original black-and-white photographs from battlefronts, liberated towns and elsewhere, the images depict soldiers in many facets of active duty. The colourization was done by Canadian Colour, with adherence to historical accuracy provided by Canadian War Museum specialists.

Tanks pass through a field during the Battle of Amiens in August 1918. (Note: This image has been reversed.)

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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In the Battle of Mons in November 1918, a platoon of soldiers (the first to arrive) enters the French town of Valenciennes from the west, headed toward the canal.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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Canadian soldiers advance across a field the during Battle of Amiens in September 1918.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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In September 1918, a medic lights a cigarette for a soldier wounded by shrapnel in a final advance on the French city of Arras. The splint supporting the soldier's arm is fashioned from a bayonet, a scabbard and an entrenching tool handle.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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General S.C. Mewburn and Lieutenant-General Arthur Currie (saluting) with marching soldiers in August 1918.

George Metcalf Archival Collection, Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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The French city of Cambrai was liberated from German occupation in October 1918, but at great cost to its buildings. Surprised and driven away by an early-morning Canadian attack, Germans set fire to many buildings as they fled.

George Metcalf Archival Collection, Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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Canadian engineers in September 1918 construct a bridge to support the advance of soldiers, tanks and artillery across the Canal du Nord.

George Metcalf Archival Collection, Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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A Canadian soldier hides behind a tree near Cambrai in October 1918.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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Canadian Private Fred Stone passes wreckage on the road between Arras and Cambrai, supported by two German prisoners, in September 1918.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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In October 1918, a German transport wagon and prisoners are escorted by soldiers of the Canadian Corps.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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After the war, in spring 1919, a German pillbox can be seen near Chilly where fighting occurred during the Battle of Amiens.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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Returning from combat during the Battle of Amiens in August 1918, soldiers from the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles crowd onto a tank. Travelling inside tanks was attempted during this battle, but exhaust and heat rendered the soldiers unable to fight due to illness.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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Citizens of the town of Valenciennes welcome the arrival of liberating Canadian soldiers in November 1918.

George Metcalf Archival Collection, Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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In March 1919, at what is now Confederation Square in Ottawa, celebrations take place at a homecoming ceremony for The Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

George Metcalf Archival Collection, Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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The Pollock family welcomes Corporal Andrew Pollock home from the front in 1919.

Canadian War Museum / Image colourized by Canadian Colour

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