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For Sept. 30, 2021, communities across Canada are marking the country’s first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring Indigenous survivors and children who disappeared from the residential school system.

Dancers perform at a powwow during a Reconciliation Day event in Cowessess First Nation.Liam Richards/The Canadian Press

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Dancers perform at a powwow during a Reconciliation Day event in Cowessess First Nation.Liam Richards/The Canadian Press

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Chief Ouray Crowfoot (right) and Councilman Kent Ayoungman (left) ride their horses during a commemorative ride on the Siksika Nation on September 30, 2021. The Blackfoot Siksika Nation recognized the first ever National Day for Truth & Reconciliation with a commemorative ride, a walk from the old residential school, words from nation elders, and traditional dancers.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

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Rico Red Old Man dances during a ceremony commemorating National Day for Truth & Reconciliation on the Siksika Nation on September 30, 2021. The Blackfoot Siksika Nation recognized the first ever National Day for Truth & Reconciliation with a commemorative ride, a walk from the old residential school, words from nation elders, and traditional dancers.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

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Two RCMP officer stand in front of a Blackfoot tipi on the Siksika Nation on September 30, 2021. The Blackfoot Siksika Nation recognized the first ever National Day for Truth & Reconciliation with a commemorative ride, a walk from the old residential school, words from nation elders, and traditional dancers.Gavin John/The Globe and Mail

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A large dreamcatcher is carried as people take part in a march to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Montreal.Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press

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Motorcyclists lead a march on Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, in Toronto.KYAW SOE OO/Reuters

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Tk'emlups te Secwepemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir speaks during a news conference ahead of a ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, B.C..DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

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Tree planting ceremony in Vickers Park on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation day in Thunder Bay, Ontario.Brandy Kenna/The Globe and Mail

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Sheila Decorte, Elder of the Fort William First Nation, watering the cedar tree during a ceremony on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation day in Thunder Bay, Ontario.Brandy Kenna/The Globe and Mail

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Community members and area residents walk as they honour the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation at Millbrook First Nation near Truro, N.S..Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

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A young boy receives a hug as community members and area residents honour the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation at Millbrook First Nation near Truro, N.S.Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

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A Canadian maple leaf with a red hand print on Parliament Hill during the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa.LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images

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People march from Parliament Hill during Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, in Ottawa.BLAIR GABLE/Reuters

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Community members and area residents honour the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation at Millbrook First Nation near Truro, N.S.Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

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Jonel Beauvais, Wolf clan from Akwesasne speaks on Parliament Hill during the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Day in Ottawa.LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images

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People stand around shoes that honor all the missing indigenous children during the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa.LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images

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A child stands by a wall of "Every Child Matters," artwork during the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa.Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

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People hold up flags during the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Ottawa.Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

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Chloe Benuen of the Innu First Nation poses in traditional costume after a ceremony at an annual Innu clan gathering on the eve of Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, at Gull Island, Labrador.GREG LOCKE/Reuters

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A camp is set up for an annual Innu clan gathering on the eve of Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, at Gull Island, Labrador.GREG LOCKE/Reuters

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A man holds up an eagle feather and burns sweet grass as people take part in a march to mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Montreal.Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press

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Chris Mejaki, from Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation during Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, in Toronto.CARLOS OSORIO/Reuters

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Henry Pitawanakwat from Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve is hugged by his niece Brianna Olson Pitawanakwat during Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, honouring the lost children and survivors of Indigenous residential schools, their families and communities, in Toronto.CARLOS OSORIO/Reuters

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Several thousand gathered for a Healing Walk throughout downtown Winnipeg on the National Day for Truth And Reconciliation.JOHN WOODS/The Canadian Press

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Tk'emlups te Secwepemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir wears earrings that say "Every Child Matters" as she listens during a news conference ahead of a ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, BC..DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

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For the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation students at Tom Longboat Junior Public School in Scarborough, Ont. made 7,500 orange flags with “every child matters” written on the flag and personal decorations. The Kindergarten to Grade 6 students gathered with orange shirts they had tie-dyed for a moment of silence and speeches of reflection for children lost to the Indian Residential School system, and the survivors. The school’s namesake, Tom Longboat, was Onondaga born in Six Nations in 1887. He escaped from the Mush Hole Residential School twice and would become one of Canada’s greatest long-distance runners.Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail

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7,500 orange flags with “every child matters” written on the flag and personal decorations are displayed at Tom Longboat Junior Public School in Scarborough, Ont.Melissa Tait/The Globe and Mail

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Kamloops Indian Residential School survivor Camille Kenoras, back left, 82, listens as drummers play during a Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, BC.DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

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People are silhouetted while attending a Tk'emlups te Secwepemc ceremony to honour residential school survivors and mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, in Kamloops, BC.DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

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People attend the Xe xe Smun’ eem-Victoria Orange Shirt Day Every Child Matters ceremony to honour victims of the Canadian Indian residential school system while at Centennial Square in Victoria, B.C.CHAD HIPOLITO/The Canadian Press

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