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Vigils were held from Nova Scotia to British Columbia for victims of the Ukrainian airliner that crashed in Iran. Flight 752 crashed Wednesday in Tehran, killing all 176 on board. Sixty-three passengers had boarded the plane with Canadian passports while 75 more were connecting through Kyiv to Canada.

Hundreds attended a candle light vigil for the victims of Ukraine International Airlines flight PS-752 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada January 9, 2020. REUTERS/Blair Gable

BLAIR GABLE/Reuters

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attends a candle light vigil for the victims of Ukraine International Airlines flight PS-752 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada January 9, 2020. REUTERS/Blair Gable

BLAIR GABLE/Reuters

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Attendees at a candle light vigil for the victims of Ukraine International Airlines flight PS-752 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada January 9, 2020.

BLAIR GABLE/Reuters

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Photos of some of the victims stand among candles as members of Toronto's Iranian community attend a vigil in Toronto on Wednesday, January 8, 2020, to mourn victims of Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 that crashed after takeoff near Tehran, Iran.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

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People attend a candlelight vigil held at the Edmonton Legislature building in memory of the victims of a Ukrainian passenger plane that crashed in Iran, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, January 8, 2020.

CANDACE ELLIOTT/Reuters

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A woman is overcome with emotion during a vigil for those who were among the 176 people who were killed when Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 crashed after takeoff near Tehran, Iran, outside the Alberta Legislature Building in Edmonton on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020.

CODIE MCLACHLAN/The Canadian Press

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Mourners attend a vigil for the victims of the Ukrainian airliner crash at Amir Bakery in North Vancouver, Jan. 8, 2020. The bakery is owned by Amir Pasavand, whose wife – Ayeshe Pourghaderi – and daughter – Fatemah Pasavand – were both killed in the crash.

Shaghayegh Moradian/The Globe and Mail

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Shokoofeh Shams and her son, light candles at a vigil for the victims of the Ukrainian airliner crash at Amir Bakery in North Vancouver, Jan. 8, 2020. The bakery is owned by Amir Pasavand, whose wife – Ayeshe Pourghaderi – and daughter – Fatemah Pasavand – were both killed in the crash.

Shaghayegh Moradian/The Globe and Mail

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Photographs of the victims of the Ukraine International Airline crash are placed by a makeshift memorial at Mel Lastman Square on Jan 9 2020. Shortly after taking off the aircraft disappeared from radar and crashed not far from the airport. 63 Canadian citizens were aboard the craft.

Fred Lum

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Flowers and candles are left among photographs at a memorial during a vigil in Toronto on Thursday January 9, 2020, to remember the victims of the Iranian air crash.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

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Members of Montreal's Iranian community attend a vigil in downtown Montreal on Thursday January 9, 2020, to mourn victims of the Iranian air crash.

Andrej Ivanov/The Canadian Press

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Members of Montreal's Iranian community attend a vigil in downtown Montreal on Thursday January 9, 2020, to mourn victims of the Iranian air crash.

Andrej Ivanov/The Canadian Press

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Members of Nova Scotia's Iranian community attend a memorial service at the Al-Rasoul Islamic Society in Halifax on Thursday January 9, 2020, to mourn victims of the Iranian air crash. All 176 people aboard Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 were killed shortly after takeoff from Tehran, including 63 Canadians. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

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