Skip to main content

Toronto Mayor John Tory cited advice from experts and a provincial law preventing public gatherings as forcing the move to cancel the next three months of events.

Eduardo Lima/The Canadian Press

Toronto’s late June weekend of Pride parades, a three-day celebration that has become a huge crowd magnet and local economic boost, is the most high-profile casualty as the city cancels festivals, conferences, concerts and other events for the next three months.

Mayor John Tory said Tuesday afternoon that the blanket cancellation encompasses all city-led events, as well as all events for which city permits have to be issued, and is in effect through the end of June.

“This pandemic is changing how we go about our daily lives in our city,” he told a city briefing.

Story continues below advertisement

“I know that these measures are hard. Festivals and events are treasured moments in neighbourhoods across the city, but the sooner we heed the advice of our medical experts on a consistent and sustained basis, the sooner we can get back to the things that we all enjoy and love.”

The latest on the coronavirus: Toronto cancels all public events through June 30; Quebec warns of equipment shortages

In a statement issued shortly after Mr. Tory spoke, Pride organizers confirmed the cancellation of the three-day event known as Festival Weekend.

“In alignment with the City of Toronto’s statement, Pride Toronto will no longer host the Festival Weekend on June 26-28,” the group said in a post on Twitter. “Stay proud and stay safe, Toronto.”

Mr. Tory cited advice from experts and a provincial law preventing public gatherings as forcing the move to cancel the next three months of events.

Eileen de Villa, the city’s Medical Officer of Health, warned at the same briefing that even stricter rules are under consideration, after saying too many Torontonians were not heeding physical-distancing orders now in place.

"I am in active discussions with all of our partners about the potential for other increased measures, and I will soon share what that means and what that looks like," Dr. de Villa said.

She warned that the longer it takes the city to comply, the longer emergency rules would stay in place: “I need each and every one of us to make our very best effort now to prevent the situation we are seeing in other jurisdictions.”

Story continues below advertisement

Christopher Mio and Meghan Hoople found themselves jobless and wanting to help in the wake of COVID-19 isolation in Toronto. After flyering their neighbourhood with a free-of-charge offer, they received an outpouring of support and requests from people in need. The Globe and Mail

Sign up for the Coronavirus Update newsletter to read the day’s essential coronavirus news, features and explainers written by Globe reporters.

Coronavirus information
Coronavirus information
The Zero Canada Project provides resources to help you manage your health, your finances and your family life as Canada reopens.
Visit the hub

In the interests of public health and safety, our coronavirus news articles are free for anyone to access. However, The Globe depends on subscription revenue to support our journalism. If you are able, please subscribe to globeandmail.com. If you are already a subscriber, thank you for your support.

Your subscription helps The Globe and Mail provide readers with critical news at a critical time. Thank you for your continued support. We also hope you will share important coronavirus news articles with your friends and family. In the interest of public health and safety, all our coronavirus news articles are free for anyone to access.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the authors of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies