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Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation president and CEO Bret Mitchell gestures during a media tour of a cannabis section at one of its stores in Halifax on July 18, 2018.

Aly Thomson/The Canadian Press

Part of cannabis and small business and retail

Nova Scotia’s cannabis retailer has placed its first orders for recreational weed – 3.75 million grams' worth.

Bret Mitchell, president of the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation, says 78 strains have been ordered from 14 vendors ahead of legalization on Oct. 17.

“We have done our homework and believe the 78 strains we have ordered will provide customers with a varied product assortment,” Mitchell said in a statement. “We have carefully selected the strains and will adjust our inventory based on customer preference.”

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The NSLC said it expects to order about 15 million grams in the first year.

The cannabis will be sold in clearly demarcated areas of 11 NSLC stores that also sell alcohol, while one downtown Halifax store will be the province’s lone pot-only retail outlet.

It will be sold in five formats: flower, seeds, pre-rolls, oil and gel caps.

The NSLC says it will carry 282 cannabis products and 21 accessories.

“I’m extremely proud of our employees for their diligence in bringing this new product category to market in a responsible way. Our focus has always been, and will remain, on the responsible retailing of this new product category,” Mitchell said.

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