Skip to main content

Part of cannabis laws and regulations

The Ontario government is launching a public awareness campaign next week aimed at educating young people about the risks of cannabis use as the drug is legalized across the country on Oct. 17.

Attorney-General Caroline Mulroney, speaking at a luncheon at Toronto’s Empire Club, said the campaign will be used to educate people about the rules, regulations and health and safety measures surrounding the use of marijuana.

She said the government is particularly focused on reaching young people on digital and social-media channels, and on television and across university and college campuses. She said the ads will appear in 10 languages.

Story continues below advertisement

“It goes without saying that these ads do not promote cannabis use or the cannabis market – but will instead focus on social responsibility, including the health and addiction risks of short and long-term cannabis use,” Ms. Mulroney told the room, which included members of the cannabis industry.

She also said municipalities will be able to enact bylaws beyond the provincial minimum standards that restrict smoking cannabis in places such as parks. Municipalities who wish to opt out of allowing brick-and-mortar retail stores will have until Jan. 22 of next year to decide.

Ms. Mulroney stressed that she and Finance Minister Vic Fedeli engaged in “extensive consultations” across the province and revealed that the government considered franchise and contract models before deciding on a licensing framework. The Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario will oversee the process.

Ms. Mulroney said the total number of licenses issued in the province will not be capped, but there will be limits on how many licences a single operator can hold “to ensure diversity in the market.”

“While certain previous activity in the illegal market will not, on its own, bar an applicant from participating, no applicant can have ties to organized crime,” she said.

Ontario will only allow online sales through its own operations when cannabis becomes legal. The new regime, which will allow for bricks-and-mortar stores, will be in place by April 1, 2019.

Available now: Cannabis Professional, the authoritative e-mail newsletter tailored specifically for professionals in the rapidly evolving cannabis industry. Subscribe now.

Story continues below advertisement

Ontario Attorney-General Caroline Mulroney says a cannabis awareness campaign launching next week will engage youth on social media and focus on “social responsibility,” as recreational marijuana is set to become legal on Oct. 17. The Canadian Press
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter