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Seeking calm when work overwhelms


With stress levels soaring, a drive in the all-new Lincoln Aviator can offer solace

Canadians are stressed and new research shows work is mostly to blame. Many employees are inundated with ever-increasing job demands, which are causing stress levels to rise, and negatively affecting relationships with friends and family.
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For respite, many are turning to activities such as taking a walk or a drive to relax, unwind and refresh their minds.

In a recent Globe and Mail survey, conducted in partnership with Lincoln, 59 per cent of respondents say work is their number one stressor, well ahead of family and finances, with nearly half reporting that they have too many work commitments.

As a result, they’re experiencing a lot of stress, some on a daily basis, which is leading them to feel anxious and overwhelmed. And although many want to connect more with friends, a majority of respondents say they don't have enough time to socialize. Nearly half say they can’t seem to make relaxation a priority.

To destress, Canadians are taking nature hikes, exercising or spending time alone. They’re also listening to music, which numerous studies show can help ease symptoms of stress, lessen anxiety and stave off depression.

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The true luxury of Aviator is the experience of leaving day-to-day pressures and entering a soothing sanctuary.

— JIM RIDEOUT, PRODUCT MARKETING MANAGER, LINCOLN

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Providing critical downtime, while still getting to where you need to be, was part of the inspiration behind the design of the 2020 Lincoln Aviator, the company’s most-advanced SUV to date. Drivers can regain a sense of control, while they and their passengers enjoy some unparalleled sound therapy.

“The true luxury of Aviator is the experience of leaving day-to-day pressures and entering a soothing sanctuary,” says Jim Rideout, Lincoln’s product marketing manager.

Stepping into an Aviator brings an immediate sense of due to its spacious, airy cabin, which has minimal visual clutter and is elegant in its simplicity. Drivers and front-row passengers can customize their seat positions for optimal comfort, with 30 different adjustment options. In-seat massage and additional lumbar support also offer a welcome way to destress.

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Unique chimes recorded by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra also provide soothing musical alerts for 25 features in the Aviator.

The ergonomically-designed steering wheel, customized for ease of use, features streamlined four-way switches at strategic positions to control music, phone and available navigation functions, in addition to settings.

The Aviator’s Revel® Ultima 3D Audio System is what’s even more unique, providing vehicle occupants the sensation they’ve entered a concert hall, enveloped in rich, superior sound through the cabin’s 28 speakers.

“With three listening modes – stereo, audience and on-stage – the control slider in the center stack allows clients to fully immerse themselves in sound, enjoying music the way they want to hear it,” says Rideout.

Unique chimes recorded by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra also provide soothing musical alerts for 25 features in the Aviator, notifying drivers of everything from an open fuel door to an unlatched safety belt, in a way that doesn’t irritate or alarm.

All in all, a drive in a Lincoln Aviator can be a therapeutic experience. With a comfortable, sophisticated interior and superior sound, it can help drivers and passengers reconnect and relax, providing a sense of calm in a stressful world. Getting behind the wheel has never been more restorative and invigorating.

Are you one of the many stressed out Canadians? We’d like to take five minutes of your time to better understand the level of stress in your life and how you respond to it.

Can't see the survey? Click here!

This content was produced by The Globe and Mail's Globe Content Studio.
The Globe's editorial department was not involved in its creation.

Content from the Globe and Mail
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