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Toyota president Akio Toyoda stands with the 2020 Toyota Supra rear-wheel-drive sports coupe at its reveal at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Jan. 14, 2019.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Having first presented it under full camouflage at the Geneva motor show last spring, then raced it camouflaged at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, then released glimpses of it, Toyota finally unwrapped the fifth generation Supra sports car on Monday in Detroit.

Last produced in 2002, the 2020 Supra is equipped with a turbocharged, 3.0-litre, six-cylinder engine generating 335 horsepower and 365 lb-ft of torque, and an eight-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters. Toyota projects zero-to-60-mph (0-96 km/h) acceleration in 4.1 seconds.

Of the two driving modes, normal and sport, Toyota says the latter is engineered for track driving. Sport mode reduces traction and stability-control functions, enhances throttle response, increases steering weight, boosts transmission shifting, makes differential tuning aggressive and amplifies exhaust sound. Torque is controlled in this mode by an electric motor and multi-plate clutches.

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The standard adaptive variable suspension, constructed with a combination of aluminum and steel, adjusts damping force based on the driver’s actions and road conditions.

Toyota took design cues from both the fourth-generation Supra and the 1967 Toyota 2000 GT, with a stretched hood, wide stance and roomy two-seat cabin. The double-bubble roof design, adapted from the 2000 GT, reduces drag. Built in partnership with BMW, the Supra shares the Z4’s chassis.

Large air intakes frame a prominent grille in front, while in the rear an arching spoiler evokes the tall rear wing that was optional on the fourth-generation turbo. Six-lens LED headlights are unique to the Supra in Toyota’s vehicle roster.

Exterior colours include bold red, yellow and blue shades, along with silver, white, black and dark grey.

The 2020 Supra is equipped with a turbocharged, 3.0-litre, six-cylinder engine generating 335 horsepower and 365 lb-ft of torque, and an eight-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters.

BRENDAN MCDERMID/Reuters

Toyota took design cues from both the fourth-generation Supra and the 1967 Toyota 2000 GT.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Inside, the heated leather seats are designed racing-style with integrated head restraints, a narrow main section and shoulder bolsters. A low, narrow dash is meant to provide the driver with generous forward visibility. A tachometer and shift-timing indicator are positioned immediately behind a small steering wheel, combining with a head-up display to aid performance driving. aAudio and nav controls are on the right side. The centre console is asymmetrical in shape, designed to envelope the driver while the roomier passenger side has kneepads “for bolstering in corners.”

Toyota first introduced the Supra in 1978 with an “A40” designation. The 2020 model, the “A90,” is the first global production car to be developed by the GAZOO motorsports division. The GR racing Supra won the Le Mans 24 Hours and the FIA World Rally Champions races in the past year.

The Supra goes on sale in the summer, with pricing announced closer to the release date.


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