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I just bought some used tires from a private seller. I cannot get them installed because any garage or service center that I take them to refuses to install them. I have been told that because of new legislation which took effect in 2018, it is against the law to install tires with any kind of cracks in either the sidewall or the treads no matter how minor. I have looked all over the internet and cannot find any evidence of any new regulations. – Cynthia

I will assume by the “new legislation” reference that you are in Ontario. Actually taking effect in July, 2016, Ontario put into place a new Passenger and Light Duty Inspection standard to accommodate the changes in vehicle design and generally replace a dated program.

Weather cracking or dry rot are common terms referring to the deterioration of a tire from age, UV rays and ozone exposure. As any tire ages, cracks will appear and slowly enlarge in the sidewall and tread of the tire.

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The standard demands that a tire cannot pass a safety inspection if UV degradation damage is more than three millimeters deep.

Given this, reputable shops will not want to put themselves into a liability position by installing tires that will not pass this standard. Unfortunately, I believe you have purchased a set of tires that are not roadworthy.

Lou Trottier is owner-operator of All About Imports in Mississauga. Have a question about maintenance and repair? E-mail globedrive@globeandmail.com, placing “Lou’s Garage” in the subject line.

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