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Because the goo is so sticky, it forms a 'Honeycomb' gel and doesn’t seep away.

joanne Elves/The Globe and Mail

Honey Goo by KLEEN-FLO

Available at: Rona, Canadian Tire, Princess Auto

Price: $10.99

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Honey Goo – seriously? What can a can of sweet-smelling waxy gooey stuff do in the garage? If you read the brilliant orange retro ad-covered can, it claims to do just about anything. So, we put it to the test on a licence plate fused to a car with rusted screws. After lubricating the screws, we read the blurb and researched the product.

Honey Goo is an all purpose, multifunctional lubricant that due to the complex combination of hydrocarbons and a large amount of “distillates including solvent-dewaxed Heavy Paraffinic,” it can be sprayed on anything that needs to either be loosened, greased or protected from rust.

Honey Goo can be used like WD-40, but because it is so sticky, it forms a “Honeycomb” gel and doesn’t seep away. Spraying it on door hinges stops the squeak, spraying the battery posts protects them from rusting or corroding.

The can art is swarming with bees and bold captions about bees but don’t worry, no bees are used in the product.

After forgetting about the licence plate for a week or two, the yellowy goo was still sticking to the screws, but the rust had started to dissolve making the removal a lot easier.

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