Skip to main content

My partner and I are looking for a well-equipped SUV. We don’t anything too small, but we also don’t want a third row. We haven’t seen anything we like in our price range (under $30,000 or, preferably, a lot less) from Honda, Toyota or GM. We’d also like something with a bit of style. – Beth, Airdrie, Alta

Among crossovers, the smallest and the biggest tend to get the most attention. But there’s a middle ground with vehicles that offer more space than a compact without dooming you to roaming the streets in search of a big enough parking space.

You’ll probably want all-wheel drive. Two options are the 2015 Nissan Murano (starting at $27,442 used, for AWD, on average) and 2015 Ford Edge (starting at $22,898, used, for AWD). Another option is the Jeep Grand Cherokee from 2014 ($23,709) or 2015 ($27,124).

Story continues below advertisement

Here, we’ll look at the Murano and the Edge.

The Nissan fares better on looks and reliability, but the Ford has the edge on the road.

2015 Nissan Murano

The 2015 Nissan Murano.

Nissan

  • Third generation: 2015 to present
  • Average asking price for base: $20,650 (Canadian Black Book)
  • Original starting MSRP: $29,998
  • Engine: 260-hp 3.5-litre V-6
  • Transmission/Drive: CVT/Front-wheel, all-wheel
  • Fuel economy (litres/100 km): 11.0 city, 9.2 highway (FWD), 11.2 city, 8.3 highway (AWD); regular gas

For 2015, Nissan’s Murano got spiffy new looks – but it wasn’t just another pretty face.

“This Murano is terrific to drive for this class,” Globe Drive reported. “Easy to enjoy on straights and in turns, quiet … and powered by a perfectly responsive, 260-horsepower V-6.”

New for 2015, the Murano came in four trims: S, SV, SL and Platinum. The base S was FWD-only and came with plenty of bells and whistles – including heated seats, push-button start, dual automatic climate control and rear-view camera. AWD was optional on the SV (with add-ons that included power seats and panoramic sunroof) and standard on the SL (leather, 360-degree around-view monitor) and Platinum (emergency braking, LED headlights).

For any of the trims with AWD, Canadian Black Book gives an average asking price of just over $27,000.

Consumer Reports praised the 2015 Murano’s “concept-car like” styling, plush near-luxury cabin, powerful engine, simple infotainment system and generous collection of standard features. But it didn’t like the “limited” rear and side visibility, lower towing capacity than some rivals (1,500 lbs to the Edge's 3,500), “overly light and numb” steering and general lack of sportiness, especially compared to the previous Murano.

Story continues below advertisement

Consumer Reports gave the 2015 Murano three out of five for reliability, with some users reporting trouble with frozen display screens. There were three recalls, including a glitch that could deactivate the passenger-side airbag when an adult is sitting in the seat.

2015 Ford Edge

The 2015 Ford Edge.

  • Second generation (the third generation is for the 2019 model year): 2015 to present
  • Average asking price for base: $20,950 (Canadian Black Book)
  • Original starting MSRP: $31,199
  • Engine: 245-hp, 2-litre turbocharged four-cylinder, 280-hp, 3.5-litre V-6, 315-hp, 2.7-litre turbocharged V-6 (Edge Sport)
  • Transmission/Drive: Six-speed automatic/Front, all-wheel
  • Fuel economy (litres/100 km): 11.5 city, 7.8 highway (FWD, four-cylinder), 11.8 city, 8.4 highway (AWD, four-cylinder); regular gas

You wouldn’t call it edgy, but the 2015 Ford Edge was bigger, better and (slightly) bolder-looking. “The new Edge looks and drives better than the prior model and offers a range of features to rival more expensive luxury cars,” Globe Drive reported.

For 2015, the Oakville, Ont.-assembled Edge came in five trims: SE (used: $20,950 FWD, $22,898 for AWD), SEL ($23,277 FWD, $25,740 AWD), Sport ($32,874 AWD) and Titanium ($29,400 FWD, 29,282 AWD). SE came with rear-view camera and push-button start. SEL gave you heated front seats and a power driver’s seat.

The 3.5-litre, 280-hp V-6 was an option on every trim except the Sport, which came standard with a 2.7-litre, 315-hp V-6.

Consumer Reports liked the Edge’s “premium feel,” “refined” four-cylinder engine, quiet interior, super-easy access and generous rear seat and cargo space. It didn’t like the thick rough pillars that hurt visibility and the “frustrating” MyFord Touch infotainment system.

It gave the 2015 Edge two out of five for reliability, with users reporting trouble with frozen display screens and leaking oil-pan gaskets. There were two recalls, including a fix to bolts that could corrode and potentially cause a loss of power steering on the road.

Story continues below advertisement

Send your used car questions to globedrive@globeandmail.com with the subject: “Buying used.”

Shopping for a new car? Check out the new Globe Drive Build and Price Tool to see the latest discounts, rebates and rates on new cars, trucks and SUVs. Click here to get your price.

Sign up for the weekly Drive newsletter, delivered to your inbox for free. Follow us on Instagram, @globedrive.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter