Skip to main content
// //

I have a 2015 Honda CR-V. I’m very happy with it, but the left rear brake is wearing prematurely. 48,000 kilometres, and I need to do it again. I believe the caliper is the problem and I think many other people have the same problem with several years of CR-V. Honda is not acknowledging the problem and says it’s the way I drive. I’m 67 and haven’t changed driving habits in 50 years until, coincidentally, I bought a Honda. Any thoughts? I do the brakes in my driveway with a retired licensed mechanic helping. – Dave B

I am confident in saying that your driving style is not the issue. However, the fact that you are doing your brakes in the driveway is the stumbling block, in my honest opinion. You have to remember you are not dealing with a manufacturer at this point, but just the opinion of a couple of dealer staff members with varying experience and attitude. I’m pretty sure that they are assuming that you and your buddy mucked up the last brake job and saying it was your driving habits is easier than questioning your mechanical skills. The best thing I can suggest is to let the dealer do the next brake job. Yes, it will cost you more, but if they wear out prematurely again, you get to have an I-told-you-so moment. If they don’t, then that confirms something went wrong in the driveway. Just make sure that your concerns are documented on their brake job invoice so you can hold them accountable.


I have a dilemma with my 2006 Prius that I just bought. You see, the car has been converted to a plug-in electric vehicle, and the company that converted it is no longer in business. The car spent a week at the Toyota Dealership, which could not be much help. I am unable to register the car in the state of California owing to this conversion and owing to the state smog computer not reading this car at all. Please help. – Farris H, Santa Barbara, Calif.

Story continues below advertisement

That’s quite the pickle you are in, Farris. I am not familiar with California law, but even so, I believe your options are extremely limited. As I see it you have two options. First, you can sell the car to someone from another state that doesn’t have the same stringent smog regulations as California. Second, you can find a local shop that specializes in hybrids and have them take a look at it, with the intent of providing you an estimate to convert back to original. Neither option is ideal, as I’m sure you will take a significant loss in either case, but what choice do you have? The dealer will not want to touch anything that has been modified, and getting it out of there is Step 1. Sorry I can’t offer more. Good luck.

Lou Trottier is owner-operator of All About Imports in Mississauga. Have a question about maintenance and repair? E-mail globedrive@globeandmail.com, placing “Lou’s Garage” in the subject line.

Shopping for a new car? Check out the new Globe Drive Build and Price Tool to see the latest discounts, rebates and rates on new cars, trucks and SUVs. Click here to get your price.

Stay on top of all our Drive stories. We have a Drive newsletter covering car reviews, innovative new cars and the ups and downs of everyday driving. Sign up today.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies