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Event summary produced by The Globe and Mail Events team. The Globe’s editorial department was not involved.

Only four percent of CEO roles at publicly-traded companies in Canada are held by women, according to The Globe and Mail’s Power Gap investigative report in January 2021. The same report found women occupy just 13 per cent of senior executive roles.

Those stats served as the springboard for a live conversation among business leaders on November 3 during the first webcast in the Globe Women’s Collective series. The webcast, titled “Gender Gap - Leadership strategies for workplace parity,” focused on actions and strategies senior executives can take now to support the advancement of women in business.

Missed the live event or would like to view it again? Scroll down to the video player, below.

Robyn Doolittle, investigative reporter with The Globe and Mail - and co-author of Power Gap - moderated the conversation and hosted the following panelists:

  • Sandrine Devillard, senior partner with McKinsey & Company
  • Wanda Costen, dean of the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University
  • Rania Llewellyn, president and CEO of Laurentian Bank of Canada
  • Rahul Bhardwaj, president and CEO of the Institute of Corporate Directors

Through the course of the discussion the group covered pressing issues such as pay parity, the role of quotas in bringing more women into executive and board roles, and the importance of male allyship. The key takeaway? We can’t wait any longer - the time for businesses to make meaningful progress on closing the gender gap is now.

Watch the full webcast (60 minutes) below:

The webcast was presented by The Globe and Mail with sponsor support from McKinsey & Company.

The Globe Women’s Collective was made possible by Founding Partner Visa Canada, Brand Partners Aviso Wealth, Dentons Canada LLP, First Capital REIT, KPMG in Canada, Novo Nordisk, McKinsey & Company, OMERS, and Suncor; and Affiliate Partner, Lean In Canada.

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