Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Support quality journalism
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24weeks
The Globe and Mail
Support quality journalism
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Globe and Mail website displayed on various devices
Just$1.99
per week
for the first 24weeks

var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){console.log("scroll");var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1);

The Geneva Motor Show is known for super luxury and supercars, but this year auto makers are also providing a glimpse into the future of some mainstream cars and new technologies.

Morgan EV3: A 2016 Morgan looks much the same as a 1936 Morgan. The company has been good at sticking with tradition and this three-wheeler is something that manages to look traditional and futuristic at the same time. It is an electric car that looks like more fun to drive than anything else at the show. No surprise for a company known for providing a raw, unfiltered driving experience.

Matt Bubbers/The Globe and Mail

1 of 12

Honda Civic hatchback: The Civic hatchback is returning to the Canadian market after 11 years and this is an indicator of what the production version will look like. This is likely more over-styled than what we’ll see on streets in the base model, but it will be available at the end of this year as a 2017 model.

Matt Bubbers/The Globe and Mail

2 of 12

Pininfarina H2 speed concept: This concept – “halfway between a competition prototype and a production supercar” – is powered by two electric motors, fed by a lightweight hydrogen fuel cell. The company says it is the “first hydrogen high performance track car in the world.”

Harold Cunningham/Getty Images

3 of 12

Peugeot Traveller: Peugeot calls this the VIP shuttle 3.0 and believes it will be the future of business customer travel. Inside, four seats are arranged facing each other around a 32-inch touch tablet. The car is a WiFi hotspot and comes with Bluetooth and charging docks.

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

4 of 12

Story continues below advertisement

Rimac Concept One: This is an all-wheel-drive, electric supercar that sprints from 0-100 km/h in 2.6 seconds, making it the fastest electric car in the world. The car on display costs $940,000 (U.S.). If it hits stores, it will compete against the Ferrari La Ferrari and other supercar makers working on electric powertrains.

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

5 of 12

Nissan IDS: IDS stands for Intelligent Driving System and the concept represents Nissan’s vision for self-driving cars and electrification.

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

6 of 12

Bugatti Chiron: Bugatti introduced the Veyron 11 years ago and it has since sold 450 examples and set a speed record for a street-legal car. Now its successor, the Chiron, produces 1,500 horsepower from a 16-cylinder engine and will go from 0-100 km/h in 2.5 seconds or 0-300 km/h in 13.6 seconds. A limiter keeps the car from exceeding 420 km/h, but Bugatti says speeds will “significantly exceed” the current top speed for the Veyron of 431 km/h. It will cost $3.5 million.

DENIS BALIBOUSE/REUTERS

7 of 12

NaroFlowcell AG’s Quantino: NaroFlowcell AG is a research and development company in Lichtenstein. The company first showed off an electric concept two years ago in Geneva and this year it unveiled its “first production-ready” car. The batteries operate using a proprietary ‘flow cell’ system where an electrolyte fuel is used to fill the car. This greatly shortens charging times and gives the car a range of 1,000 kilometres.

DENIS BALIBOUSE/REUTERS

8 of 12

VW T-Cross Breeze: Nissan didn’t have much success with its convertible Murano, but maybe Volkswagen thinks it can catch on. It unveiled a concept sport utility convertible, calling it a glimpse of what is coming to the company’s SUV lineup in the near future.

DENIS BALIBOUSE/REUTERS

9 of 12

Ferrari GTC4 Lusso: This three-door wagon is the successor to the Ferrari FF. It may look a bit awkward, as you wouldn’t expect to see a Ferrari hatch, but it’ll go 0-100 km/h in 3.4 seconds and top out at 335 km/h.

Sandro Campardo/AP

10 of 12

Maserati Levanti: Maserati is the latest luxury sports car maker to enter the SUV game. The Levante will have a lot of competition, as Porsche, Bentley and Jaguar are already in the game and Aston Martin, Lamborghini and Rolls-Royce are all expected to soon join.

Sandro Campardo/AP

11 of 12

Subaru XV concept: This is a good indication of what the new Crosstrek will look like. The rest of Subaru’s lineup may follow the design language.

Martial Trezzini/AP

12 of 12

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies