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One of the first three Harley-Davidson motorcycles ever built.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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Harley-Davidson produced the Sport model between 1919 and 1923.

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In 1921, the first 74 cubic inch V-twin engine was introduced on the JD and FD models. Harley-Davidson dealerships are now found in sixty-seven countries.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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In 1914, sidecars are made available to Harley-Davidson buyers.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1925 Harley-Davidson 61 Cubic Inch model: By 1925, gas tanks on all models of Harley-Davidson bikes had a distinct teardrop shape. This basic appearance was set for all subsequent Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1926 Harley-Davidson side valve single cylinder: In 1926, single-cylinder motorcycles are again sold by Harley-Davidson for the first time since 1918. Models A, AA, B, and BA are available in side-valve and overhead-valve engine configurations.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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JDH two-cam motorcycle: The first Harley-Davidson two-cam engine is made available to the public on the JD series motorcycles in 1928. The bike was capable of top speeds between 85 - 100 mph.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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In 1928, front wheel brakes were available on all Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1942 Harley-Davidson XS model

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1958 Harley-Davidson Duo-Glide: The first rear brakes and hydraulic rear suspensions appear on the Duo-Glide in 1958.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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In 1964 the three-wheeled Servi-Car becomes the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle to receive an electric starter.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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The first Electra Glide motorcycle was introduced in 1965, replacing the Duo-Glide. The Electra-Glide was the first FL available with electric start, and the Sportster line would receive electric starters soon after.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1966 Harley-Davidson Bobcat

Harley-Davidson Archives

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In consideration of new AMA rules for Class C racing, the Sportster-based XR 750 racer was introduced in 1970.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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Harley-Davidson introduced its first cruiser, the FX 1200 Super Glide, in 1971, combining a sporty front end (similar to that of the XL series) with the frame and powertrain of the FL series.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1977 Harley-Davidson FXS Low Rider: With drag style handlebars, unique engine and paint treatments, the Low Rider lives up to its name by placing the rider in a lowered seating position than was typical.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1984 Harley-Davidson Softtail: FXST Softail was a trendsetter in styling, using the method of “hiding” the motorcycle's rear shock absorbers.

Harley-Davidson Archives

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1991 FXDB Dyna Glide Sturgis: The Dyna line of motorcycles debuts with the 1991 FXDB Dyna Glide Sturgis

Harley-Davidson Archives

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The Harley-Davidson FXSTD Softail Deuce

Harley-Davidson Archives

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