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Serengeti Sunglasses

Long drives are hard on the eyes, especially when the sun plays hide-and-seek through the trees. Your sunglasses are too dark for the shady spots, so you remove them only to be blinded when the sun pops out to reflect off the lake. A pair of sunglasses that can handle changes in light will decrease that eye strain.

Serengeti pioneered the photochromic technology in sunglasses that is activated by UV light. On cloudless days the lens molecules expand in size, darkening the lenses to absorb more light. In shade, the molecules shrink so more light filters through. The spectral control technology also filters specific wavelengths to sharpen colours and reduce glare. We tested the women's Elba and the men's Giacomo on the slopes of a mountain resort.

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Both pairs of sunglasses are dark to begin with so neither tester noticed the darkening when the sun came out, but what they instantly appreciated was the clarity and contrast. The sunglasses worked brilliantly skiing in the sun and in the fog layer. On the highway, the glare from the wet road was reduced by the polarized lens. Interestingly, neither tester appreciated the eye protection and reduced strain provided by sunglasses prior to testing the Serengeti's, but do now.

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