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1958 retrofitted electric truck, dubbed Retro Electro, hits the road. For the full story from Peter Cheney, please click on the link below.

Retro Electro truck - 1958 Chev Apache pickup converted to electric power by Electric Autosports of Vancouver. It is part of Steam Whistle Breweries' unique vehicle collection in Toronto.

Peter Cheney/The Globe and Mail

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Instead of inventing all-new vehicles, Electric Autosports puts electric drivetrains into old ones. For about $25,000, they will sell you a kit that will let you electrify your own car.

Peter Cheney, Peter Cheney/Peter Cheney

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Under the hood of the Retro Electro truck, heavy duty cables carry power to the electronic unit that controls power flow from the battery pack.

Peter Cheney/The Globe and Mail

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Steam Whistle Breweries Retro Electro truck, the 1958 Chev Apache, was converted to run on electric power. The original V-8 engine was torn out and replaced with an electric drive-train.

Peter Cheney/Peter Cheney

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The Retro Electro had an undeniable presence, and it was a blast to drive a 1958 pickup truck that didn't make any noise. But there was no power steering, and the 600 pounds of batteries loaded in the back didn't help matters - every corner was an arm wrestling match. The brakes were pretty scary, too.

Peter Cheney, Peter Cheney/Peter Cheney

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Mike Kiraly of Steam Whistle Breweries inspects the battery pack in the Retro Electro truck.

Peter Cheney, Peter Cheney, Pete/Peter Cheney/The Globe and Mail

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Greg Murray, president of Electric Autosports, a shop that specializes in electric car conversions. Murray is shown here with a Mazda Miata that has had its gas tank removed to make space for a battery pack.

Electric Autosports, Peter Chene/Electric Autosports

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Under the hood of a car converted to electric power by Electric Autosport of Vancouver.

Electric Autosports/Electric Autosports

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Steam Whistle breweries Retro Electro truck uses green energy from wind and solar production facilities.

Peter Cheney, Peter Cheney, Pete/Peter Cheney/The Globe and Mail

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