Skip to main content

Geneva has long been less about the business of auto-making, more about the look – the design – of it. The Geneva Motor Show is held on neutral ground in Switzerland. All other major global shows – Frankfurt, Tokyo, Detroit, Shanghai/Beijing – are hosted by countries where auto-making is a key industry. Switzerland is famous for banks and other money-managing businesses, along with watches, chocolate and a host of non-governmental agencies such as the World Health Organization and the International Olympic Committee.

No one has a home-field advantage – or disadvantage – in Geneva.

Here, the designers and the visionaries take the stage, with the messy business side of the industry taking a back seat to old-style automotive glitz and glamour.

Audi

Audi Prologue Avant

The e Audi prologue Avant is a five-door luxury car that allows the driver and up to three passengers to enjoy a luxurious ride that allows everyone to be digitally connected thanks to a state-of-the-art infotainment architecture and connect technology. This plug-in hybrid is a look at possible styling for the next A6 wagon Power output by the 3.0 TDI engine and the electric motor in combination make the car sprint from 0 to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds.

Jeremy Cato

BENTLEY EXP 10

This is Bentley’s interpretation of a high performance, two seat sports car. “This one car showcases modern automotive design, highly skilled British handcrafting, the finest materials and advanced performance technology,” says CEO Wolfgang Dürheimer.

Infiniti

Infiniti QX30

Nissan’s luxury brand is desperate to launch a model into the growing and highly important small crossover segment. This is it, or something very close to this will arrive in showrooms early next year. “We’ve used expected materials in an unexpected way, and given functional elements an artistic twist,” said Infiniti design chief Alfonso Albaisa. “It is the unconventional execution of a conventional element that makes the QX30 Concept a design leader.”

Nissan

Nissan Sway

The current Nissan Micra looks pretty dated compared to this Sway concept. But what we have here is a look at creative thinking behind the next-generation Micra. Nissan says this is “a concept car designed especially to appeal to European tastes. It is seen as emotional, edgy and exciting.” Nissan says this concept was inspired by the IDx show car first revealed at the 2013 Tokyo motor show."With this new concept car for Geneva, we are experimenting to see how Nissan might be able to bring fresh ideas to the compact hatchback segment," says Nissan design chief Shiro Nakamura.

Lexus

Lexus LF-SA

Think small. Lexus is. This ultra-compact, urban 2+2 ride suggests that Lexus is aiming to compete in the tiny urban runabout segment – up-market branch, of course. Lexus says the LF-SA driver-focused, which reflects Lexus’ vision that a real driving experience will remain the ultimate luxury. And it’s small: 3,450mm long, 1,700 mm wide and 1,430 mm high. That makes is fit nicely in a crowded city. Inside, the 2+2 cabin has among other things a fixed the driver's seat, with adjustable steering wheel and pedals, bringing the vehicle to the driver. The infotainment system includes a hologram-style digital display incorporated in the instrument binnacle and a wide-angle Head-Up-Display.

Jeremy Cato

Kia Sportspace

Kia says this is a stylish and athletic grand tourer in the classic sense – “ready to eat up the miles across continents, whether for business or leisure.” European design boss Gregory Guillaume says that unlike traditional estate cars, wagons or even shooting brakes, the Kia Sportspace “presents an architectural outline that is distinctly different and sophisticated” – with a long and lean profile with unbroken surfaces and purposeful lines. Power comes from a diesel-electric hybrid previously seen on the Optima T-Hybrid concept at the 2014 Paris Motor Show.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Instagram

Add us to your circles

Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.