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A man lights a marijuana joint as he participates in the 4/20 protest on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, April 20, 2015. It has taken more than 40 years but the government of Canada is finally formally committing to legalizing marijuana. Gov. Gen. David Johnston delivered the governing priorities of Justin Trudeau's Liberals in the speech from the throne Friday, including a pledge to "legalize, regulate and restrict access to marijuana." THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The Canadian Press

Almost half of weed-smoking Canadian drivers say that they can safely operate a vehicle while stoned.

Among Canadians who have driven under the influence of marijuana, 44 per cent don't think it impacts their ability to drive safely, according to a report Tuesday by State Farm. That compares with 42 per cent who acknowledge a difference and 14 per cent who don't know.

Insurers have been highlighting the risks of marijuana as legal restrictions ease and cultural norms shift, especially among youth. Liberty Mutual Holding Co. and a safety group said in 2013 that most teenagers who drove under the influence of the drug said it either improved their performance behind the wheel or was no hindrance. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised to legalize the substance.

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"We know marijuana impairs judgment and reaction time," John Bordignon, a spokesman for State Farm, said in a statement. "So any move to legalize it has to be matched with safeguards to discourage drivers from getting behind the wheel while they are influenced by it."

More than 60 per cent of people surveyed think the Canadian legal system is unprepared to deal with people who drive under the influence of marijuana, according to the State Farm survey. Almost nine of 10 say they've never driven stoned. The online survey polled 3,000 Canadians of driving age in March.

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