Skip to main content

Globe Drive Reveal: Escala Concept is the best-looking Cadillac in decades

Cadillac unveiled its best-looking car in decades on Thursday: The Escala Concept.

The company divulged few details about the four-door sedan, including whether it will ever bring it to production, but Cadillac President Johan de Nysschen said the vehicle does indicate concrete things to come.

(General Motors)

“The car is not an announcement of a forthcoming production car,” de Nysschen told attendees at a sprawling California mansion in the hills above the ocean. “It’s an announcement of the direction that we are thinking about for technologies, for automation, for connectivity, for interior design, for craftsmanship, but most of all a very tangible expression of the new Cadillac design language that you will find in forthcoming Cadillac products.”

In other words, think of Escala, which will be on display this weekend at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, as a hint.

(General Motors)

So far, we know that the car comes with 22-inch rims and “monkey-spoke” wheels, a milled aluminum grille, LED tail lights, and clean, streamlined lines from the front to the rear. The side windows run uninterrupted by the typical body pillar between the front and rear of the car.

Escala is also obviously longer than the CT6, Cadillac’s excellent new sedan, and is built on Cadillac’s new large car rear-wheel drive platform. The name means “Scale” in Spanish.

(General Motors)

Inside, Escala has American walnut wood, leather trim, and linen-like textiles inspired by men’s suiting. There are curved OLED digital screens in front of the driver, computer screens in the back of the front seats, and a huge panoramic ceiling that spans the top. Its overall aesthetic is more convincing and realistic than the Ciel and Elmiraj concepts Cadillac has flaunted in recent years.

The whole thing is powered by a twin-turbo, eight-cylinder engine, de Nysschen said. It’s a car that is meant for a driver but that “you’ll desperately want to drive yourself,” he added.

Let’s hope we get the chance.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Latest Videos