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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio priced from $52,995 in Canada

The 2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio.

Priced to compete in the hot luxury SUV market, the Stelvio offers 306 lb-ft of torque, pledged to be the best-in-class

FCA Canada announced aggressive pricing Wednesday on its much-anticipated 2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio, with the base model to start at $52,995.

The Ti (Turismo Internazionale) trim starts at $54,995. Equipped with standard all-wheel drive, both models will be available in the fall.

In the hot luxury SUV segment, the Stelvio will compete with the Audi Q5 ($54,200), BMW X5 ($68,500), Jaguar F-Pace ($50,250), Mercedes-Benz GLE ($63,800) and Porsche Cayenne ($69,600), among others.

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The Stelvio has an eight-speed automatic transmission.

In the United States, MSRP is $41,995 (U.S.) and $43,995 respectively.

The third model in the line, the Quadrifoglio, featuring a Ferrari-sourced turbocharged V-6 engine, is not yet priced but is expected to nudge the six-figure mark.

The Stelvio, manufactured in Italy, is powered by a 2.0-litre, four-cylinder turbo engine, paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission. The 280-horsepower is slightly less than provided by some competitors, but its 306 lb-ft of torque is pledged to be best-in-class, offering 0-100 km/h acceleration in 5.5 seconds and a top speed of 232 km/h.

The car is named after the twisting Stelvio Pass in the Italian Alps.

Named for the Stelvio Pass – the famed twisting, climbing road in the Italian Alps – Stelvio's standard features include a DNA (dynamic, natural, all-weather) drive mode selector, leather interior, heated front seats and steering wheel, remote start with passive entry, bi-xenon headlamps, dual exhaust, carbon-fibre drive-shaft, Formula-One-inspired steering wheel and a seven-inch infotainment screen.

The Ti adds standard 19-inch wheels, wood interior accents, an 8.8-inch infotainment screen, 3D navigation and front park sensors.

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