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1. Vancouver police defend mocking Lamborghini driver after impounding car

In early December, Vancouver police sent out a tweet mocking a Lamborghini driver after he was caught speeding and the police towed his car.

Many commenters to our initial story suggested that it was inappropriate and unprofessional for police to send the tweet because of the lack of due process. Police responded, saying that the tweet went viral and all of those people were engaging in a discussion about the dangers of speeding, something that kills more than 100 people on British Columbia roads each year.

Getty Images/iStockphoto

2. New test coming soon for elderly Ontario drivers

In April, Ontario changed the license testing for people aged 80 and over with new procedures to include a vision assessment, in-class group evaluation, a review of the driver’s record and two short exercises to test basic auditory language skills, memory, motor function and the ability to plan and organize. Many seniors were outraged, calling the change “rank discrimination.”

3. Distracted driving now deadlier than impaired driving

After receiving a loving text from her boyfriend, Emy Brochu texted him back while driving. It’s not clear if she ever read his final text before smashing into the back of a transport truck on a Quebec highway. Police deemed texting to be the cause of the crash. Distracted driving is eclipsing impaired driving as the leading cause of crashes and fatalities in many regions across Canada.

Ken Gadsdon

4. How I got revenge after bad service at a dealership

In the new My Favourite Car Story series, we asked readers to write in about their favourite stories involving a car. Ken Gadsdon wrote about how he was so infuriated by a saleswoman at a Southern Ontario Volkswagen dealership that he drove two hours to another dealership, bought the car without a test drive and made sure to show off his new car to the rude saleswoman.

Joel Bissell/MLive.com

5. The cold, hard facts about seven winter driving myths

Globe Drive columnist Peter Cheney debunks myths such as all-season tires being good enough in winter, that snow tires are unnecessary if you have all-wheel drive, and that bigger treads mean more control.

iStockphoto

6. Don’t want to switch to winter tires? Then consider the all-weather option

Fifty-one per cent of Canadians switch to winter tires, but all-weather, not all-season tires may be the best option for those who don’t want to make the switch, but still want good traction in winter – especially drivers who live in a moderate urban climate such as Toronto or Vancouver.

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