Skip to main content
Welcome to
super saver spring
offer ends april 20
save over $140
Sale ends in
$0.99
per week for 24 weeks
Welcome to
super saver spring
$0.99
per week for 24 weeks
save over $140
// //

The Vancouver Police Department is defending the decision to tweet a photo of a Lamborghini being towed after it was clocked allegedly going more than twice the speed limit.

Since the story was posted Thursday, many commenters on The Globe and Mail website and on Facebook have suggested that the actions of the police were "inappropriate" and unprofessional because of the lack of due process.

"The traffic violation…involved a luxury sports car that was exceeding the posted speed limit by 52 km/h, or double the speed that was allowed under the provincial Motor Vehicle Act," Vancouver Police Department media relations officer Randy Fincham wrote, in an email. "That vehicle would have required approximately 70 metres to stop, in ideal conditions, if someone had stepped into the roadway."

Fincham added that speeding is one of the biggest causes of death on B.C.'s roads with more than 100 people kiiled each year.

One of the dissenting commenters, identified as THS2, wrote: "Funny as the tweet might be, absolutely inappropriate for the police to be making fun of someone. Dosen't sound like impartiality to me. This isn't about having or not having a sense of humor, it's about a lack of professionalism. Think the officer would be upset if someone clocked him/her at being over the speed limit and posted it?"

Vancouver police believe that publicizing the incident will act as a deterrent – the role of the courts, traditionally.

"That tweet… has been viewed over 100,000 times, national and internationally," Fincham added. "Those are 100,000 people who have now engaged in a conversation about the dangers and consequences of speeding. Unfortunately I will have to let you decide if that meets your definition of 'inappropriate' or 'unprofessional'."

Police said the vehicle will be impounded for seven days, but would not disclose the owner or driver. The police fogged out the dealer plates in the picture. Lamborghini Vancouver, the accredited dealership in the city, told the Globe that the vehicle is not theirs.

On Tuesday evening the force tweeted these two photos showing a 2015 Lamborghini Huracan caught speeding and the vehicle being loaded onto a tow truck.

If writing a ticket for the driver, towing the car and tweeting the photo weren't enough, the caption reads like a MasterCard commercial.

The Huracan has a base price of about $250,000 and with 610 horsepower it can go from 0 to 100 km/h in 3.2 seconds. It has a top speed of 325 km/h.

The big problem for the 30-year-old driver? The speed limit on Cambie Street near West 54th Avenue is 50 km/h. The Lamborghini was clocked at 102 km/h, allegedly.

Like us on Facebook

Add us to your circles.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Latest Videos

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies