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Fully-electric zero-emissions vehicles are a tough sell in Canada. They make up about 0.2 per cent of the current market and, through the first half of 2015, Canadians purchased slightly more than 2,000 electric cars, out of the more than 1.1 million total cars sold. In Ontario, the government offers incentives of up to $14,000, which bring prices more in line with those of gasoline cars, but the cars remain unpopular.

Fully-electric vehicles in the Netherlands, by contrast, made up 1.4 per cent of sales in 2013. On a per capita level, the Netherlands have the second-most plug-in electric vehicles of any country, behind only Norway. Electric vehicle owners are already eligible for tax breaks and parking spots, but the government is looking to take it a step further.

A number of Dutch politicians are proposing banning the sale of gas and diesel-powered vehicles starting in 2025.

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The lower house of the Dutch parliament recently supported the motion put forward by the Labour PvdA party, according to NOS. The cabinet must now come up with a plan to implement the proposal.

It calls for a complete ban on all vehicles that aren't emissions-free, which means efficient hybrids and plug-in hybrids will also be banned. Hydrogen fuel cell cars will be allowed.

Members of the right-wing opposition party are calling the motion "overambitious and unrealistic." They suggest 15 per cent market share for Evs is realistic by 2025.

However, according to The CIA World Factbook, in 2012 84 per cent of the electricity produced in Holland comes from fossil fuels and 14 per cent is from renewable sources.

The same group of politicians is hoping the country will make substantial investments in autonomous cars to reduce congestion.

The motion has yet to pass into law.

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