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James Bond is renowned for driving cars we all wish we could drive. But good luck getting your hands on the new Aston Martin DB10.

Sam Mendes, director of the newest Bond film Spectre, commissioned Aston Martin to create the car. Only 10 were built and, the Daily Mail reports, seven were destroyed during filming. The production crew blew up £24 million ($48 million) worth of cars in the film, which reportedly costs £200 million ($400 million) to make.

In photos: New Aston Martin DB10 roars around Rome

"We set a record for smashing up cars on Spectre – seven Aston Martins in all," said chief stunt co-ordinator Gary Powell, to Event magazine. "In Rome, we wrecked millions of pounds' worth of cars. They were going into the Vatican at top speeds of 110 mph. We shot one entire night for four seconds of film. There was a risk of skidding into the Vatican – that would have been catastrophic, but the sequence went without problems."

Video: Take a spin in the Aston Martin Vanquish, the closest you can get to the new Bond car

In one chase scene, Bond is pursued in his Aston Martin by a villain in a Jaguar C-X75 through the streets of Rome. "Millions of pounds worth of high-performance vehicles were written off," reports the Daily Mail. Bond also destroys a villain's Land Rover, smashing into it with a plane. Bond, naturally, walks away as if going for a stroll in a park.

The DB10 is based on the chassis of the Vantage S. According to The Telegraph, the newest Bond-mobile features a six-speed manual transmission (because Bond is a purist) that comes with rear-wheel drive and a V-8 engine that pumps out 430 horsepower.

The 10 built are also equipped with an ejector seat, which was initially made famous in the 1964 film Goldfinger, in which Sean Connery drove an Aston Martin DB5.

Spectre hits theatres in Canada Nov. 6.

Here is what Mendes and Daniel Craig (James Bond) said about the car:

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