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The Phantom Zenith collection.

Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars is ending production of the Phantom, including the Coupe, Drophead and limousines, as the British company switches to aluminum architecture and introduces a new convertible, the Dawn.

The Phantom is in its seventh generation – it was initially launched in 2003 as Rolls-Royce regenerated as a company.

Fifty special editions of the 2016 Phantom Coupes and Dropheads will mark the end of the model's production life. They'll be called the Phantom Zenith – "a contemporary and beautiful Phantom enhanced with cutting-edge technologies and design innovations," CEO Torsten Mueller-Oetvoes said, in a statement.

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"As the name promises, Zenith will be the pinnacle; the best of its kind; the highest standard achievable by which everything else is judged," director of design, Giles Taylor said.

Features are to include laser-etched armrests, bespoke instrument dials and custom treatment of the Spirit of Ecstasy figurine on the hood. The cars will be offered in a palate of colour combinations from Rolls-Royce history.

The 2016 Dawn, outfitted with a twin-turbo 6.6-litre V-12 engine, is inspired by the Silver Dawn, an unique edition of Rolls-Royce built between 1950 and 1954. Aimed at a younger, perhaps more carefree buyer, the car is described by the company as a "striking, seductive encounter … an erotic tingle on the skin, an awakening of the senses and passions as the day begins."

A select group of media will drive it soon – look for a report by Matt Bubbers.

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