Skip to main content

Self-driving cars means rush hour will certainly become more interesting.

iStockphoto

As the great minds of the world ponder all the game-changing implications of a world featuring autonomous cars, along comes Barrie Kirk to say what we've all really been wondering about.

"I am predicting that, once computers are doing the driving, there will be a lot more sex in cars," Kirk, of the Canadian Automated Vehicles Centre of Excellence, told The Canadian Press on Monday.

"That's one of several things people will do," Kirk continued, "which will inhibit their ability to respond quickly when the computer says to the human, 'Take over'."

Story continues below advertisement

Meanwhile, in other autonomous car news ...

Forget sex, let me sleep

A survey by whatcar.com reports that 26 per cent of British motorists would be comfortable taking a nap while being driven in a self-piloting vehicle.

Google cars in two accidents

Google reports that its self-driving prototypes were involved in two minor accidents in April, both in Palo Alto, Calif., one on April 7, the other on April 28. Neither accident, however, was initiated by the Google cars. In the first incident, another vehicle's mirror grazed the side of a Google Lexus RX 450h when it attempted a pass and, in the second, a vehicle travelling at about 15 km/h rear-ended a stopped Google "bubble car" – which was waiting for an opening in traffic to make a right turn.

Google, FCA join forces

Google has teamed up with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to build a fleet of 100 self-driving minivans.

Story continues below advertisement

Google's autonomous technology will be integrated into 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivans – which will be tested by Google's self-driving car team on its private test track in California.

"The experience both companies gain will be fundamental to delivering automotive technology solutions that ultimately have far-reaching consumer benefits," Sergio Marhionne, FCA's CEO, said in a statement released Tuesday.

Traffic isn't going anywhere

Contrary to the widely held belief that self-driving vehicles could ultimately eliminate traffic congestion, at least one transportation expert is saying the opposite.

"​We could end up with a lot of cars on the road," AnnaLisa Meyboom, director of the Transportation Infrastructure and Public Space Lab research group at UBC, told CBC's The Early Edition on April 25. "You've all sorts of potential extra people on the road that don't currently drive, including kids, dogs and people who are blind."

Like us on Facebook

Story continues below advertisement

Follow us on Instagram

Add us to your circles

Sign up for our weekly newsletter

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter