Skip to main content

This is the car that will boost Audi’s sales in Canada in 2014

2015 Audi A3 cabriolet

Audi

How Audi Canada's parent, Audi AG, could postpone products that fit the needs of Canadian, and even American buyers, seems more than odd until you compare Audi's sales in North America to its sales in China.

Aha! Through the first two months of this year, Audi China delivered 76,884 vehicles, compared to 23,372 combined in Canada and the United States. China is three times as important as North America, sales-wise.

Audi has been focusing on China with laser-like precision, just like other German auto companies. And Chinese buyers have been snapping up German vehicles at a ferocious rate. While the A3 has a role, it's certainly not as important in China as it will be in Canada when the new version arrives this spring.

Story continues below advertisement

Thus, Audi Canada had to make do for most of last year without a new compact A3 in its lineup. Lacking a reinvented A3, Audi Canada's sales in 2013 were flat. The soon-to-arrive new A3 is also why Audi Canada president Wolfgang Hoffmann insists that sales in 2014 will jump significantly.

That said, he would have loved to have seen the new A3 in showrooms last year. What he won't and can't say is that Canada is a little down on the list of priorities back home at Audi headquarters in Ingolstadt – certainly below China. If we ranked higher, the A3 would have been rushed to dealer showrooms at light-speed.

Product cadence, the rate at which new models are introduced, is a big deal at Audi. At Audi's annual conference this month, company officials pointed to the launch of 17 new models this year alone, on the heels of 15 new ones and derivatives last year.

Canadians can look forward to not just the A3, then. Also coming are at least four other interesting new offerings: the A3 e-tron hatchback, a new Q3 small SUV, a freshening to the A8 and a new TT sports car.

Audi Canada is going to have a busy 2014.

If you have questions about driving or car maintenance, please contact our experts at globedrive@globeandmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @Globe_Drive.

Story continues below advertisement

Add us to your circles.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter