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A Phoenix man is offering people the chance to stay overnight in what he calls the "fastest hotel in the world." It is his Tesla Model S. You won't actually get a chance to drive the $118,000 car that can go zero to 100 km/h in four seconds, but for $109 a night , you can sleep in the back while it is parked in a locked garage.

The experience is offered as an alternative to a hotel.

AirBnB

“The airbed in the back sleeps two in climate-controlled comfort all night,” writes Steve Sasman in his AirBnB listing. “You can set the mood with your selection of any Internet music you would like on a huge 17” monitor. ... It comes with clean sheets, pillows and a blanket or comforter if you like.”

The twin airbed is only a bit longer than two metres so tall people may not be comfortable.

“Sorry, NO NBA players allowed. Despite my love for basketball, the Tesla is just too small for anyone over 6’6”. Please…stop asking,” he writes.

Guests have access to Sasman’s kitchen, living room and bathroom, but because he needs the car to get to work, they must be up by 8 a.m.

“I’ve already slept in this thing three times so why not let other people do it,” Sasman told CBS5. “To sleep in it one night is to give somebody a taste…They get to spend some time in the car, experience it without actually buying it.”

Last-minute football fans, note: The Tesla Hotel will not be available in the days leading up to Super Bowl this weekend, taking place just outside of Phoenix.

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