Skip to main content

Research In Motion (RIM) held an event Aug 3, 2011, where select fans/ users of RIM devices got a sneak peak at their three newest smartphones.

Fred Lum/Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

The great BlackBerry blackout this month has prompted the filing of a potential class-action lawsuit in Montreal against smart-phone maker Research In Motion .

Lawyer Jeff Orenstein, of Consumer Law Group Inc., filed a lawsuit in Quebec Superior Court on Tuesday against Waterloo, Ont.-based RIM, demanding compensation for Canadian BlackBerry users left without e-mail, BlackBerry messenger service and Internet access between Oct. 11 and Oct. 14.

The worse service glitch in BlackBerry history hit tens of millions of users worldwide, and came as RIM faced other negative headlines about its declining market share and sinking stock prices.

Story continues below advertisement

The lawsuit, which must still be certified as a class action by a judge, was filed on behalf of a man who says he is owed $1.25 for the day-and-a-half he had no BlackBerry service. The lawsuit claims that RIM's offers of a free month of technical support for enterprise customers and free access to $100 worth of premium app downloads were not enough.

The law firm behind the suit has also launched false-advertising cases against the makers of Nivea My Silhouette "slimming" cream and against Reebok for its EasyTone shoes.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter