Skip to main content

CAW overwhelmingly support strike mandates at Big Three in contract talks

CAW National President Ken Lewenza speaks at the Canadian Automotive Workers' First Constitutional and Collective Bargaining Convention in Toronto on Monday, Aug. 20, 2012.

MWS/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Hourly workers at Chrysler, General Motors and Ford plants in Canada have voted overwhelmingly to go on strike to back their contract demands, according to their union.

The Canadian Auto Workers union says Chrysler workers have voted 99 per cent in favour of strike action if necessary.

The vote was almost as strong at General Motors, where 98 per cent backed strike action, and at Ford, where the vote was 97 per cent.

Story continues below advertisement

The voting was conducted at a number of meetings over the last week and this past weekend, CAW said in a news release.

"Our members support their bargaining committees and trust them to negotiate a fair settlement that shares in the success of the companies," union president Ken Lewenza said in statement.

Negotiations with the North American auto companies resume Monday in Toronto.

The union is looking to share in improving financial position of the Big Three after making concessions during the recession.

However, the auto makers are looking to pare costs labour costs in Canada, which they say are higher than in the United States.

The last CAW strike was in 1996, against General Motors. The current contract expires Sept. 17 at 11:59 p.m.

Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.