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Employees and guests of Groupon, celebrate the company's IPO at Nasdaq, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 in New York. CEO Andrew Mason is center rear. Groupon, the company that pioneered online group discounts, has begun trading as a public company. The stock jumped nearly 50 percent in the opening minutes Friday. (AP Photo/Employees and guests of Groupon, celebrate the company's IPO at Nasdaq, Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 in New York. CEO Andrew Mason is center rear. Groupon, the company that pioneered online group discounts, has begun trading as a public company. The stock jumped nearly 50 percent in the opening minutes Friday. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Mark Lennihan/Mark Lennihan/AP

Here's some news that won't come as a big shock to anyone who is skeptical about splashy initial public offerings: Despite initial euphoria, high-profile Internet-related IPOs perform no better than those not-so-exciting non-Internet IPOs. On average, both types are under water from their original pricing.

Internet IPOs have certainly enjoyed big one-day moves after the stocks start trading. LinkedIn Corp. jumped 109 per cent when it debuted in May; Groupon Inc. rose nearly 31 per cent, and that was when the overall stock market was rocky. According to Dealogic (via The Wall Street Journal), the average gain among Internet-related IPOs on the first day of trading this year is an amazing 28 per cent, versus just 7 per cent for non-Internet IPOs.

The initial gains can trigger feelings of envy among investors who didn't participate. However, the cold facts from Dealogic suggest that investors should have nothing envy. Both Internet and non-Internet IPO stocks, on average, are down 8 per cent from their original starting points.

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So far, LinkedIn and Groupon are exceptions. The stocks are up 70 per cent and 16 per cent, respectively, from their IPO prices – even though both have slipped considerably from their earlier highs. But as the Journal points out, stocks like Renren Inc. and Pandora Media Inc. have dragged the average down.

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About the Author
Investing Reporter

David Berman has been writing about business and investing since 1995. He has written for a number of magazines, including Canadian Business and MoneySense. He worked at the Financial Post as an investing writer and daily columnist before moving to the Globe and Mail in 2008. More

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