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On Tuesday, I wrote a blog and a lengthier newspaper article about the widespread bearishness among retail investors, financial advisers and fund managers. The backdrop was a bit perplexing, of course: Amid the bearishness, the S&P 500 was on a six-day winning streak, rising 6.5 per cent. For some readers, no doubt, the gains made the article look a little dated.

But check this out: Bespoke Investment Group on Tuesday conducted a poll among its blog readers, asking them whether they thought the recent stock market correction was over or not ("Would the S&P 500 make a new bull market high before it makes a correction low?"). Turns out, bearishness remains pretty sticky.

Despite a good start to the second quarter earnings season and a nice rally over the past week and a half, only 39 per cent of the 569 respondents believe that the correction is over - a very low number, it seems, given the bullish backdrop of the past several days. That leaves 61 per cent who are convinced that the correction still has room to run.

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Bespoke didn't compare this reading to other polls, so it might not be worth much as a scientific reading on market sentiment. Consider it as something to chew on.

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