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Ships under construction at a Rongsheng Heavy Industries shipyard in Nantong, Jiangsu province, in a file photo.

ALY SONG/REUTERS

A roundup of what The Globe and Mail's market strategist Scott Barlow is reading this morning on the World Wide Web.

"Meltdown" is too strong an adjective for a Chinese economy that is still growing at more than six per cent annually at the very least. At the same time, it's clear that the country's credit-driven growth model is wobbling badly, taking commodity prices and commodity-related currency values, including the loonie, lower.

The news is bad enough to motivate Business Insider to title their summary, "China reported a ton of economic data this weekend, and all of it was bad."

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China may very well be the world's largest economy by 2030, as many predict, but the mini-linkfest below highlights how the short-term outlook is deteriorating badly.

"China reported a ton of economic data and all of it was bad " – Business Insider

"China slowdown underway" – Sober Look

"Oil – the Next commodity domino?" – Naked Capitalism

"Almost half of wealthy Chinese say they want to leave the country" – China RealTime (Wall Street Journal blog)

"China's crude steel production growth has also slowed as the property sector cools " (with chart) – Royal Bank of Scotland, Twitter

"Europe slides as China output slows" – FastFT (subscription required)

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"OECD cuts economic growth forecasts" – Wall Street Journal (subscription may be required)

European think tank Breugel posted a helpful summary of views regarding the economics of Scotland's bid for independence. In terms of my personal opinion, I'm staying out of this one – the vehemence on the "Yes" side is prohibitive. The vote will be close, by most accounts, and the whole "neighbour versus neighbour" thing is regrettable no matter what the result of the vote.

"The economics of Scottish independence" – Bruegel

I frequently get asked about my personal investments and, since I've already detailed my worst investing mistake of the past decade, Juniper Networks Inc., I don't feel guilty about describing another stock I own, one that's turning out well this morning, SAB Miller PLC.

SAB Miller is trading sharply higher in London this morning on speculation that AB Inbev is arranging a takeout bid. I'm happy holding the stock long term no matter what happens, not least because it's not that sensitive to a global economic slowdown.

I bought SAB Miller about two years ago. Valuations were reasonable, the dividend yield high, profit growth steady if not spectacular. The company is a relatively stable play on emerging markets consumption growth. They own half of China's most popular beer, Snow, and dominate beer sales in the African frontier markets.

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"SAB Miller shares jump on report of AB InBev interest" – CNBC

Tweet of the Day, with chart, is from Business Insider: "@bysamro For all y'all suckas who think stocks trade on fundamentals in the short run (via @FactSet) pic.twitter.com/XRUBK7mjxP

Diversion: This might only interest me, but whatever. "What do we have to learn from ants? Nothing" – Sullivan, Daily Dish

Follow Scott Barlow on Twitter @SBarlow_ROB

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