Skip to main content

Contestants in the men's race chase a Double Gloucester cheese down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 25 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Thousands of spectators gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200-metre slope -- which has a 1:1 gradient in parts -- in a series of races, said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Although six in 10 Canadians are still planning a summer vacation, Only 18 percent of Canadians looking to get away will travel outside the country, according to the Canadian Press Harris-Decima poll.

However, if you are one of the few who is heading across our border, remember to add travel insurance to your holiday to-do list.

In my opinion, travel insurance is a necessary precaution any time you leave the country. Last month, to Argentina, even though my husband and I have some coverage through work. Call me paranoid, but I would prefer to err on the side of caution than face unexpected medical costs on foreign soil.

Story continues below advertisement

If you do have coverage through a group plan at work, review it carefully as it may only cover a small portion of emergency medical care and may exclude family members. If you are relying on the travel insurance available through the credit card you used to book the trip, be aware that it typically only covers travel accident insurance and not illness.

Even to ensure adequate coverage in foreign countries.

Provincial health insurance plans are unlikely to cover all international, or even out of province, medical expenses. Ontario's OHIP only covers up to $400 a day and British Columbia's Medical Services Plan covers just $75 a day. Out-of-town emergency care costs can quickly grow well beyond those limits.

For example, , emergency care for an ankle sprain in Mount Worcester, VE, will set you back $468, after provincial health plan reimbursements.

As with any kind of insurance, your age and health will affect the price and accessibility of a plan. A reader of this blog recently wrote me wondering whether her husband, who had suffered a heart attack, would be eligible for travel insurance. The short answer is that it depends on the stability of his condition.

Insurance providers may not cover you or may charge higher premiums if you have certain pre-existing conditions, such as a heart problem or high blood pressure. You should speak with your provider to discuss what is and is not covered and read the find print on your contract.

A new travel website called , sponsored by insurance provider , is a good resource for more information on travel insurance and also offers some helpful tips to make the most of your getaway.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter