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Globe readers love reading stories about money, how to repay it, save it, and invest it. The best-read stories of 2014 - measured by online traffic - range from housing and retirement to cars and investing. Below are the best-read personal finance news stories of 2014, as chosen by you.

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Does it make more financial sense to own a condo or rent an apartment?

While most people buy property to build equity or wealth, others choose to build their wealth by saving or investing in business opportunities other than real estate. Read the full story here.

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Want to retire in Canada? Here are seven surprisingly warm spots

Looking to move to a less-expensive home in a community that offers a good quality of life? Here’s a list of places that offer warmer climates and amenities designed to entice retirees. And no, they are not in the United States.

KEVIN VAN PAASSEN for THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Living in Retirement: I’m sorry I ever downsized to a condo

The value of the downtown Toronto condo our retirement blogger bought hasn’t risen in the two years since she bought it. Repairs take months and condo fees have risen twice. She writes about how she's joined the group of Canadians suffering from condo remorse.

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Three common RRSP mistakes you’ll want to avoid

Whether it’s spousal RRSP contributions or how to offset capital gains, these three rookie mistakes could cost you thousands. This story by our Tax Matters columnist was a hit with readers.

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Do you really need a million dollars by the time you retire?

So how exactly do financial planners and advisers calculate a magic number their clients can retire on and what information do they need to make a calculated stab? We asked a couple of advisers to pull back the curtain and reveal the criteria they use.

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When it comes to home buying, smaller is better

When you buy a house, you’re going to be facing a lot of expenses...above and beyond your new mortgage payments. Heating, electricity, insurance, and property taxes are just some of the additional bills that come with owning a house.

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Is it still cheaper to buy a slightly used car than a new one?

For the many Canadians who will be financing their next vehicle, the game has changed. When you factor in the incentives and vehicle financing rates now available on new cars, it’s possible to find situations where the monthly payments and the lifetime principal plus interest costs over equal terms are lower for new cars.

Darren Calabrese for The GLOBE AND MAIL

Couple have good income but are falling deeper into debt

Jane and John seem to be sliding ever deeper into debt and don’t quite know what to do about it. He is 39, she is 41. They have two children, four and three. Given John’s $165,000-a-year salary, they should be okay.

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Gen Y money: Trying to save on an entry-level salary? Good luck

In the last year, I have graduated from university with an English degree and started an entry-level job. I’ve finally entered the life phase where everyone’s concerns - including my own - have shifted from how much money I’m spending to how much I’m saving. Given that I’m chin-deep in student loans, I can tell you that it’s not much.

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Can you really live (well) overseas on $25,000 a year?

The lure of a more affordable lifestyle is certainly a strong motivator for moving overseas. And it's one that's attracting more and more baby boomers to far-flung corners of the world. So what does it cost to live in one of those exotic locations you've been dreaming of? Read this book excerpt to find out.

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If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

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