Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Nadianb/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The most pinned sandwich on the social network Pinterest has no bread – it's made of cheese and roast beef between cucumber slices. This sandwich is supposed to be for picky kids, but cost-conscious adults should give it a try, too.

Bringing your lunch to work is one the most basic ways to save money on a weekly basis. Ramit Sethi, author of I Will Teach Your To Be Rich, is a believer. So am I. After overdosing on food court lunches many years back, I started bringing my own lunch most days. But here's the thing about packing your own lunch. Unless you're creative, your meals can quickly become monotonous. That's where the radical sandwiches on Pinterest come into play.

Aside from the ingredients, there's a cost to bringing your own lunch in the form of time spent getting things ready. Here's some advice on prepping a week's worth of lunches in under an hour. Total estimated cost savings by not buying lunch out: $3,380 per year.

Subscribe to Carrick on Money
Are you reading this newsletter on the web or did someone forward the e-mail version to you? If so, you can sign up for Carrick on Money here.

Buy a home – it's good for you
As a personal finance guy, my take on home ownership is driven mainly by affordability. There's also the case to buy a home because of the social benefits. Academic research shows that owning a home is associated with better educational and health outcomes, stronger families and more.

Question: What's another name for a long-term investment?
Answer: A failed short-term investment. More jokes about the financial advice biz here.

The story of Toronto's classiest con man
That's how The Walrus describes a man you'll read about in this page-turner of a story. Make time for this one.

Advisers vs. advisors
There's been some talk recently about how investment advice people calling themselves advisors are just sales people, while those listed as advisers – note the e – are bound to put client interests first. Here's a thorough look at how these two titles play out in the real world.

Today's featured financial tool
The federal Financial Consumer Agency of Canada offers these resources for teaching children about money. There's advice on allowances, teaching teens about credit and more.

Ask Rob
The question: "I notice that most conservative investment portfolios are 60 per cent stocks and 40 per cent bonds. Why are GICs seldom mentioned for fixed income?"

The answer: The big reason is that investment firms make more money from selling bonds and bond funds than they do from GICs. Practically speaking, GICs are not easily sold before maturity. Someone who might need to dip into his or her investments at some point should not be in a GIC. Bonds and bond funds are much more liquid.

Do you have a question for me? Send it my way. Sorry I can't answer every one personally. Questions and answers are edited for length.

In case you missed these Globe and Mail personal finance stories
– Newlyweds need a clear financial plan for their future home
– Renting out space in your home: Is the stress worth it?
– The 2017 ETF Buyer's Guide: The complete series (for Globe Unlimited subscribers)

More Carrick and money coverage
For more money stories, follow me on Twitter and join the discussion on my Facebook page. Millennial readers, join our Gen Y Money Facebook group.

Send us an e-mail to let us know what you think of my newsletter.

Want to subscribe? Click here to sign up.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies