Skip to main content
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
Canada’s most-awarded newsroom for a reason
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Rail cars arrive in Milton, N.D., loaded with pipe for the first Keystone Pipeline project.

Eric Hylden/The Associated Press

TransCanada Corp. has again rerouted its proposed Keystone XL pipeline in Nebraska in the face of local opposition to the $7.6-billion project to carry Canadian oil sands crude to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

In a statement Wednesday, TransCanada said it filed a supplemental environmental report to the Nebraska state government, with a 32-kilometre jog that would take a bigger detour around the sensitive Sandhills area and avoid crossing groundwater sources for two towns.

The new route "was developed based on extensive feedback from Nebraskans and reflects our shared desire to minimize the disturbance of land and sensitive resources in the state," TransCanada chief executive officer Russ Girling said.

Story continues below advertisement

TransCanada has begun construction of the $2.3-billion southern leg of the Keystone project, which would take crude from the Cushing, Okla., terminus to the refining hub on the Gulf Coast. But it is stalled on the $5.3-billion, Alberta-to-Oklahoma section until Nebraska approves its route and the U.S. State Department issues a permit. TransCanada hopes to receive that permit and begin construction early next year.

It still faces public hearings in Nebraska, amid opposition from landowners and environmental groups.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies