Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

The technology and communications services sectors are set to underperform, according to BofA Securities U.S. quantitative strategist Savita Subramanian. A dramatic 2000-style implosion is unlikely, but competitive profit growth will remain hard to find for the foreseeable future.

In Monday’s The U.S. equity investor’s guide to Tech stocks research report, Ms. Subramanian noted that technology stocks now less obscenely valued than in 2000. Then, the forward price-to-earnings ratio for technology stocks and communications services stocks was 53 times and 34.1 times respectively. Now, it’s 25.0 and 22.5.

Less extended valuations, along with high and improving profit margins, should help protect the technology and communications services stocks from catastrophic stock price declines. This is important for overall benchmark returns as both sectors contain some big winners from pandemic spending that have outsized effects on index performance. Communications services, for instance, includes Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc., Netflix Inc. and video gaming developers Take Two Interactive Software Inc. and Activision Blizzard Inc.

Story continues below advertisement

These stocks are less frothy than in 1999, but valuations are not attractive relative to the S&P 500 as a whole. Earnings forecasts for technology and communications services are lower than the benchmark – energy, industrials, consumer discretionary, materials and financials are all expected to grow profits more quickly – and yet technology stocks trade at a premium valuation to the index.

There are other complications. Technology companies have been the main beneficiaries of globalization (the sector has the highest percentage of foreign revenue) and tax arbitrage (moving operations to low tax jurisdictions). Geopolitical tensions with China threaten to reverse globalization, at least in part, and the new G7 minimum corporate tax proposal would increase tax expenses in many cases.

The pandemic left very few companies able to generate growth in 2020 and early 2021 and most of them were technology-oriented. Investors were happy to pay high valuations for them because profits were cratering everywhere else.

The economic re-opening is now providing stiff competition in terms of companies with strong earnings growth and, while there will certainly be individual technology and communications services stocks with portfolio-enhancing success, investors can no longer buy blindly or widely in these sectors.

-- Scott Barlow, Globe and Mail market strategist

This is the Globe Investor newsletter, published three times each week. If someone has forwarded this e-mail newsletter to you or you’re reading this on the web, you can sign up for the newsletter and others on our newsletter signup page.

Stocks to ponder

Story continues below advertisement

Nutrien Ltd. (NTR-T) The Saskatoon-based company is expected to deliver robust year-over-year earnings growth driven by positive industry conditions. The company started the year off on a positive note, reporting first-quarter financial results that sharply exceeded the Street’s expectations causing the share price to spike 4 per cent the following trading day. Management increased its earnings outlook for 2021 with many analysts modestly increasing their target prices; however, analysts’ target prices may prove to be too conservative, according to Jennifer Dowty.

The Rundown

Four threats that could derail the bull market

Gordon Pape asked his readers what they believed to be the greatest risk to the current bull market. There were four options from which to choose. Here’s what he found.

Money for life: The pros and cons of the Purpose Longevity Pension Fund

A pioneering new retirement product offers a step forward in Canadians’ continuing struggle to generate income for life. Most notably, it aims – but doesn’t guarantee – to deliver a 6.15-per-cent annual return for life on contributions made by a 65-year-old investor. The catch? The new Purpose Longevity Pension Fund, from Purpose Investments Inc. in Toronto, also demands that investors deal with a novel (and sometimes sticky) structure and accept some fundamental uncertainties,” writes Ian McGugan.

Story continues below advertisement

The future of money: The digital currency revolution is here

There is a coming storm in the world of finance as governments around the world engage in a global contest to digitize their currencies. Michael Doyle looks at a coming storm in the world of finance.

Others (for subscribers)

The most oversold and overbought stocks on the TSX

Monday’s analyst upgrades and downgrades

Monday’s Insider Report: CEO invests over $500,000 in this rising large-cap dividend stock

Story continues below advertisement

The Globe’s stars and dogs for the week

Bullish on Dollarama Inc.

Investors eye Washington talks after big rally in infrastructure shares

Others (for everyone)

Supercycle, what supercycle? China’s commodity imports fail to impress

Globe Advisor

Story continues below advertisement

Are you a financial advisor? Register for Globe Advisor (www.globeadvisor.com) for free daily and weekly newsletters, in-depth industry coverage and analysis, and access to ProStation - a powerful tool to help you manage your clients’’ portfolios.

Ask Globe Investor

Question: I own Toronto-Dominion Bank shares in my TD brokerage account and in my Scotia iTrade account. Obviously, the average costs for the shares in each account are not identical. Question: If I sell some or all of the TD shares in the TD account, for capital gains purposes do I use the average cost that shows in the TD account, or do I use the average cost across both accounts?

Answer: You would need to calculate the average cost across all non-registered accounts in which you hold TD shares. Any TD shares held in registered accounts should be excluded from the calculation as they are not subject to capital gains tax.

“Under the ‘identical property’ rule in the Income Tax Act, where a taxpayer buys and sells several identical properties, such as common shares, at different prices over a period of time, the taxpayer has to calculate the average cost … to determine the adjusted cost base (ACB),” said Jamie Golombek, managing director, tax and estate planning, with CIBC Private Wealth Management.

Brokers typically provide “average cost” or “book value” figures for clients, but these numbers don’t apply when identical shares are held in multiple non-registered accounts, Mr. Golombek said.

Story continues below advertisement

The good news is that calculating the average cost should be relatively painless. Just add up the total cost of your TD shares (including trading commissions) and divide by the number of TD shares you own. If you were to then sell, say, 100 TD shares, you would multiply the average cost by 100 to determine the ACB of the shares sold. Next, subtract this from your sale proceeds (minus commissions) to determine your capital gain (or loss). Only half of capital gains are included in income for tax purposes.

One other thing to note: When you sell a portion of your shares, the average cost of the remaining shares does not change.

-- John Heinzl

What’s up in the days ahead

Click here to see the Globe Investor earnings and economic news calendar.

More Globe Investor coverage

For more Globe Investor stories, follow us on Twitter @globeinvestor

You may also be interested in our Market Update or Carrick on Money newsletters. Explore them on our newsletter signup page.

Compiled by Globe Investor Staff

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies