Skip to main content

A humorous look at the companies that caught our eye, for better or worse, this week

Dollarama Inc. (STAR)

DOL - TSX

Great comebacks of 2019: 1) The St. Louis Blues rally from last place in the NHL to win the Stanley Cup; 2) The Toronto Raptors, trailing Milwaukee 2-0 in the conference final, go on to win the series and then topple Golden State for their first NBA crown; 3) Shares of Dollarama, hammered in 2018 by slowing growth, surge after the retailer posts a same-store sales increase of 5.8 per cent in the first quarter – double the gain analysts had expected. Somebody get the company a trophy.

Story continues below advertisement

RH (STAR)

RH - NYSE

“Look honey, I got us a new sofa, a dining room table and two armchairs at RH – all for less than $20,000!” Home furnishings retailer RH – formerly Restoration Hardware – may not have the lowest prices on the block, but folks with bucks to spare just love it. The shares surged after RH posted a 7.4-per-cent increase in first-quarter revenue as adjusted earnings topped estimates, helped by higher margins. With RH also boosting its full-year forecast as it takes steps to mitigate the impact of higher tariffs, investors can even afford chairs for their new dining room table.

Beyond Meat Inc. (STAR)

BYND - Nasdaq

No animals are harmed in the making of Beyond Meat burgers, but how many innocent peas are brutally sacrificed? Investors in the company that makes plant-based “meat” don’t care – they’re too busy making money. Since going public at US$25 a share on May 1, the stock has rocketed about 500 per cent and now trades at a vertiginous multiple of about 2,500 times estimated 2020 earnings. Even as analysts begin to question the company’s lofty valuation, gluttonous investors seem to have no concept that they might be getting led to the slaughter.

Hudson’s Bay Co. (STAR)

HBC - TSX

After all the pain and suffering HBC shareholders have endured – are these people masochists? – they deserve some good news for a change. Shares of the long-struggling department store retailer jumped after a group led by executive chairman Richard Baker unveiled a $1-billion cash proposal to take the company private at $9.45 a share – a 48-per-cent premium to the stock price before the offer was announced. Unfortunately, it’s roughly one-third of HBC’s stock price just four years ago.

BCE Inc. (DOG)

BCE - TSX

Story continues below advertisement

A price war? In Canada’s oligopolistic wireless industry? Well, sort of. A day after Rogers Communications Inc. announced a $75 “unlimited” monthly plan with no data overage charges, rival BCE unveiled its own $75 “unlimited” data promotion. But there’s one teeny weeny catch: Both companies are offering only the first 10 gigabytes of data at maximum speeds, with anything more than that slowed down considerably. Still, just the thought that Canada’s big wireless players might sacrifice some of their prodigious profits in the name of competition was enough to send the stocks lower.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter