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A roundup of what The Globe and Mail’s market strategist Scott Barlow is reading today on the Web

The majority of global economists and strategists predicted ‘synchronized global economic growth’ that would push cyclical assets like commodities and industrial stocks higher. As Citi economist Catherine Mann points out in a recent research report, it hasn’t turned out that way,

“ Disparities below the surface on global growth. Synchronized global growth is long gone, leaving domestic demand as the key driver. Herein lies substantial differentiation between a robust US, firing on all cylinders of consumption, business investment, and government; a more moderate picture for Europe with business investment more cautious relative to consumption, and China slowing on consumption and investment with fiscal policy responding. This differentiation filters through to EMs via both trade and financial linkages. “

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“@SBarlow_ROB C: “Synchronized global growth is long gone”” – (research excerpt) Twitter

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The self-explanatory “How much can I afford to spend in retirement” blog offered ten tip on how to increase retirement spending. A few of the tips were painfully obvious, like “get a part-time job” and find a rich person to marry, but I thought tip No. 2 was helpful,

“ Consider all your assets. Another way to find more assets is include the present value of other sources of income (or future sales of assets) in your ABC calculations. For example, you may plan to sell your house, business or boat, collectable art, etc. at some time in the future. You may also believe that you will receive an inheritance from a family member or win the Lottery in the future. We generally caution individuals from including inheritances or future Lottery winnings as assets in their spending budget calculations unless (until) they become reasonably certain that they will be receiving such assets. If you do consider all your assets in your spending budget calculations, we also encourage you to consider all your spending liabilities. “

“Ten Possible Ways to Increase Your Current Retirement Spending Budget Under the Actuarial Approach” - How much can I afford to spend in retirement

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The U.S. and Mexico had a NAFTA negotiation party and Canada wasn’t invited,

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“NAFTA talks are poised to spill into next week, pushing up against the goal for a deal by the end of the month, as the U.S. and Mexico work out their issues in order to reincorporate Canada…

the U.S. and Mexico are running out of time to get a deal and have President Donald Trump and his counterparts sign it before Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto leaves office in December. Some of the toughest issues, like an American demand for greater access to the Canadian dairy market and a clause that could end Nafta after five years, remain unsettled.

"We need to have engagement with Canada, and the only way it can happen is if we continue through the weekend and into next week," Guajardo told reporters Thursday afternoon.

“Nafta Talks Set to Run Into Next Week as Canada Sits on Sideline” – Bloomberg

Related: “Exclusive: China to keep hitting back at U.S. over trade, to boost government spending - finance minister” – Reuters

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Tweet of the Day: “@CNBC Commentary: Here are the top-ranked female portfolio managers in the U.S. cnb.cx/2PyTTBQ “ – Twitter

Diversion: “Can you use Spotify’s algorithm to find the saddest pop songs of all time?” – A Journal of Musical Things

Thursday Globe Investor newsletter: “If Canadian investors aren’t worried about market liquidity, they probably should be” – Globe Investor

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