Skip to main content

A roundup of what The Globe and Mail’s market strategist Scott Barlow is reading today on the Web

Citi strategists have identified a number of investment themes they believe are set to explode in popularity,

“One notable point is that a number of the concepts we look at have actually been around for a while — all-solid-state batteries, anti-aging medicines, eSports and offshore wind turbines — but something has changed in each of them, such that we’re now at a tipping point of accelerated adoption.”

Story continues below advertisement

I have a lot of cultural (and physical health) issues with the eSports trend but the growth is undeniable,

“eSPORTS Viewership of eSports is currently on par with American football and is expected to grow 14-15% by 2021”

“@SBarlow_ROB Citi sees period of ‘accelerated adoption’ for eSports, solid state batteries, offshore wind” – (research excerpt) Twitter

“@SBarlow_ROB C top investment trends graphic” – (research excerpt) Twitter

" DISRUPTIVE INNOVATIONS VI Ten More Things to Stop and Think About " - (Full report) Citi

**

I’m going to expand on this for the Globe Investor newsletter later today, but Morgan Stanley is very concerned about a slowdown in global growth,

Story continues below advertisement

“Global growth continues to decelerate, DM inflation keeps rising, financial conditions carry on tightening and trade tensions carry on escalating. All these presenting a challenging backdrop, even before we consider poor seasonality for August/September. The level of growth/inflation/policy may be OK, but the direction of travel remains problematic.”

“@SBarlow_ROB MS not liking 2nd derivative of global growth” – (research excerpt) Twitter

**

The Financial Times’ Alphaville site (free to read with registration) details the ongoing correction in Australian housing prices. Canada and Australia’s are not entirely analogous – they are at different stages of the interest rate cycle, for one – but both countries are heavily exposed to commodity demand and have seen significant housing bubbles.

The answer to the question “is Australia’s real estate market correction and omen for Canada?” is “let’s hope that’s as bad as it gets here”,

“The Australian Bureau of Statistics put out a helpful infographic last month, showing some price declines in the eight capital cities in the first three months of the year, although Tasmania's Hobart is still going strong… [The report] also put the overall decline in context, a mere $22.5bn drop set against the $6.9tn value of the 10m residential dwellings in the country. The mean price of a dwelling was $687, 700. .. The investment bank's economists put it in the context of a generally positive assessment of the economy, and expect higher interest rates some time late next year. So, not a crash unfolding, just the orderly first stages of a correction almost three decades into an Australian economic miracle. Good to know.”

Story continues below advertisement

“That unfolding Australian house price crash” – FT Alphaville

**

‘Liquidity’ is a word I suggest investors get familiar with in the coming weeks,

“a global liquidity squeeze unerringly finds its way to the weaker links in the world economy. Emerging markets with any combination of large current account deficits rising inflation, politicised monetary policy or large dollar borrowings are clear cases in point… There are vulnerabilities in the developed world, too… corporate bond spreads are widening. And in the sovereign debt market Italy is in the line of fire.cits, rising inflation, politicised monetary policy or large dollar borrowings are clear cases in point… “

“Global liquidity squeeze looks set to continue” – Financial Times (paywall)

“Some disquieting conclusions for investors about global investment flows” – Barlow, Inside the Market

Story continues below advertisement

Tweet of the Day: “@SBarlow_ROB GS: Hedge fund VIP stock list underperforming, largely due to FB” – (table of stocks) Twitter

Diversion: “World’s busiest air routes, 2017” – Marginal Revolution

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies