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Our roundup of Canadian small-caps of between $100-million and $2.5-billion in market capitalization making news and on the move today.

goeasy Ltd. (GSY-T) announced a strategic partnership and minority equity investment in PayBright, a Canadian fintech that handles instant point-of-sale consumer financing and installment payment plans.

"Through this new strategic partnership, goeasy’s consumer lending division, easyfinancial, will become the primary provider of non-prime financing within PayBright’s point-of-sale payments platform," the company stated.

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The company said it will acquire a minority equity interest in PayBright for $34.3-million and will receive "customary shareholder rights as a significant strategic minority investor," including a seat on the company’s advisory board.

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WeedMD Inc. (WMD-X) announced a $10-million bought-deal financing. It has an agreement with a syndicate of underwriters that has agreed to buy 10,000 convertible debenture units at a price of $1,000 per debenture unit. Each convertible debenture unit will consist of one 8.5-per-cent unsecured convertible debenture and 625 common share purchase warrants of the company. The net proceeds will be used for working capital and general corporate purposes, the company stated.

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Turquoise Hill Resources Ltd. (TRQ-Q) announced that it received an automatic non-compliance notice from Nasdaq Stock Market LLC on Aug. 28 because its shares have failed to maintain a minimum bid price of US$1 for 30 consecutive business days. “In order to regain compliance, the company’s common shares must have a closing bid price of at least US$1 for a minimum of 10 consecutive trading days,” it stated, adding that it has 180 calendar days to regain compliance with the minimum bid price requirement.

The company said it has notified Nasdaq that it intends to "pursue measures to cure the share price noncompliance," and added that it's in compliance with all other Nasdaq listing rules.

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Trilogy Metals Inc. (TMQ-T) announced the resignation of Rick Van Nieuwenhuyse as CEO, president and director. James Gowans has been appointed CEO and president on an interim basis. Mr. Van Nieuwenhuyse will remain as a consultant to the company until January 31, 2020 and will assist with transitional matters and with advancing the company’s interests in Alaska, the company stated.

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Waterloo Brewing Ltd. (WBR-T) reported net revenue increased 2.7 per cent to $17-million in the second quarter up from $16.6-million in the prior year. Analysts were expecting revenue of $17.4-million. Net income was $952,000 or 2 cents per share down from $1.4-million or 4 cents a year ago.

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Western Forest Products Inc. (WEF-T) announced that the company and the United Steelworkers Local 1-1937 expect to begin mediation with an independent-mediator on Sept. 13.

“We look forward to resuming discussions with the USW to negotiate a collective agreement that creates certainty for our employees, while maintaining Western’s competitive position during this particularly challenging time for the forest industry,” said Don Demens, CEO of Western. “It is important that we resume operations to supply our customers who, through their purchases, create thousands of jobs in BC.”

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The strike started on July 1 and affects all the company’s USW certified manufacturing and timberlands operations in B.C., the company said.

Western also responded to the North American Free Trade Agreement binational panel’s decision related to a prior U.S. International Trade Commission ruling.

“While we are pleased with the panel’s decision to send the U.S. lumber Industry’s injury case back to the USITC for review, we are disappointed that the panel did not make a similar finding in relation to the USITC’s ruling that cedar/redwood is a distinct product group from commodity structural lumber”, said Mr. Demens.

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